Archibull Prize judging travels east to west

Week 2 Day 5 of judging saw 2014 Archibull Prize judge Wendy Taylor travel from the eastern suburbs of Sydney to Mt Anan in the West

First up was Little Bay Community of Schools entry Bloo Moo ‘Grass to Glass’ – ‘Have three serves of dairy and fly through your day’.

Bloo Moo is the result of a peer teaching and learning partnership across the five
Little Bay Community of Schools. Year 8 students from Matraville Sports High acted
as mentors, peer teaching the Primary students dairy content and art making techniques.

This is what Wendy had to say about Bloo Moo

Little Bay Community of Schools

“Blue Moo” is definitely a cow that could jump over the the moon.

Her wings are fabulous! Made from recycled plastic milk bottles, they soar from her sides and are a real statement feature. Her sponged blue skin highlights her painted patches, which tell the story of milk from ‘grass to glass’ as well as portraying her as a crazy, ‘extraordinary dairy’ cow.

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Next up was mentor school Matraville Sports High School Wendy said “Mattooo” is a study of contrasts.

She tells a subtle story of dairy from ‘farm to fridge’ through layers of contrast and pared back simplicity. Her hard black side is overlaid with delicate topographic mapping of NSW dairy farming areas, while her white side is a mass-produced fridge. Inside, is an exquisite stylised digestive diagram based on indigenous motifs and a high tech projection which tells the inside story of the dairy industry. She showcases complexity and simplicity.

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Next Wendy headed south west to Narellan to visit Elizabeth MacArthur High School

This is what Wendy had to say about their Archie they have named Susan

This “Susan” is not a lazy Susan or a Black-eyed Susan.

She is busy and vibrant. Her bold colours catch the viewer immediately and her tactile and interactive features invite you to touch. The growing grasses along her back and at her feet are a highlight and help to tell Susan’s story of the grain industry. Her beautifully painted head is a stand out.

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Archibull Prize judging goes south of the border to ‘Mexico’

Week 2 Day 3 of  Archibull Prize 2014 judging saw Wendy fly from Newcastle to Melbourne where she visited Kilbreda College and the Emerson Special School

This is what Wendy had to say about the schools she visited in Melbourne

First up was Kilbreda College

“Hidey” has nothing to hide! She has a very simple and subtle story – showing a pictorial of different grains an1d their textures. It is her vibrant bands of eye-popping colour overlaid with the intricate patterns of the grains which give her visual appeal. The balance of colour, pattern and texture is very well done. Her living grain base is a nice contrast and adds to the sense of balance.

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Follow Kilbreda College Archibull journey via their blog here  and their video

From Kilbreda College Wendy travelled to Emerson School.

Each year with the support of a different organisation Art4Agriculture is able to support a school who isn’t able to undertake the full program but are passionate about sharing the great stories of farmers and farming with their students. This year Emerson Special School was chosen to be that school and wow what a special group of people they are ( students and teachers)

Emerson School is a specialist school located in Dandenong, Victoria, catering to students with mild intellectual processing difficulties. From an initial enrolment of less than 100 students in 1973, Emerson has grown to be one of the leading providers of specialist education in Victoria, with 100 staff now supporting 400 students to achieve their potential.

A proud and vibrant member of the local community, Emerson prides itself on being a school of first choice – not a school of last resort.

The Emerson community exists to provide a first rate education to all who walk through its doors. Emerson School is comprised of our Junior School (students aged 5-11 years), Middle School (12-15 years) and Senior School (16-18 years). Class sizes range from 8 students per class in the Junior School to 16-19 in the Middle and Senior Schools. These small classes ensure that programs are able to be tailored to individual students’ requirements. Source

This is what Wendy had to say about Emerson Public School

“Daisy” is very well named. She is cosy and comfortable and warm. Her knitted coat has loads of texture and appeal, with the felted daisies being the standout feature. Her stylish hat and gorgeous eyelashes complete the picture. Her story of wool is simple and thorough and perfectly encapsulates the breadth of the learning done by the students.

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Watch the wonderful video they have made of their  journey with Daisy to learn about wool

The Archibull Prize judging see Moos in the Museum

Week two Day two of the 2014 Archibull Prize judging found Wendy at the magnificent Newcastle Museum

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Newcastle district primary schools and Maitland Grossman High School put on a wonderful display of Archie’s at the museum for both Wendy and the public

This is what Wendy had to say

Hamilton North Public School’s “Mr Archiwool” is so warm and well wrapped up!

He is clever, vibrant and tactile. His subtle story of the Wool industry is well thought out and well expressed and his links to Bessie (their Young Farming Champion) are beautiful. His sense of fun and playfulness are undeniable. He perfectly captures the fact that simplicity can be a very effective tool.

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Is “Mabel”  from Maitland Grossmann High School a pull-along toy? Or is she a pair of jeans?

Her subtle worn-looking base coat is the star. It ties all her elements together into a homogeneous design, while adding a layer of depth. The pull along toy concept is clever and quirky, while the denim look (especially around the neck) is effective and creates a fine layer of detail. She tells a quiet and subtle story of cotton in a very expressive way.

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Threadrick McBobbin from Bolwarra Public School is a character.

From his highly original name to his stylish hat, skintight jeans and buttoned-up shirt, this little cow is big on personality. His seasonal pictorial of the cotton industry is simple, beautiful and informative, while his furrowed base and little trolley of products complete the story. He is charming and vibrant and very expressive.

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“WiriChick”  from Wiripaang Public School is in a class of its own!

She is unique in just about every aspect – she is alone in representing the egg and poultry industries this year; she has used projections (which is a first for the Archibull Prize); and the sheer number of different techniques explored on her surface make her stand out. The colourful mosaic surface is wonderful, as is her crushed eggshell face and feathered legs.

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Archibull Prize judging takes us to China

Day 1 of Week 2 of the 2014 Archibull Prize judging saw artwork judge Wendy Taylor head west towards the Blue Mountains

First off the rank was Hurlstone Agricultural High School

This is what Wendy had to say about their Archie who they have called Ni Cow

“Ni Cow isn’t a bull in a china shop. She is a cow from China.

Everything about her has layers of meaning and complexity and has been well thought out. She is well balanced visually, and takes an interesting viewpoint with both her sustainability message -that of financial sustainability -as well as her viewpoint of the dairy industry. She is relevant and intrinsically unique. Her delicate patterning and limited colour palette perfectly reflect the concept. No detail has been missed and every component adds to the total picture.

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Next up was Hawkesbury High School

Wendy said “Baa-Baa Rella” has the best horns!

They are red and white striped and link perfectly with her name and elements of the wool industry (Barber’s Pole Worms). She shows us two very different views of the wool industry in Australia. One side is vibrant, lush and reminiscent of the paintings of Tom Roberts, while the other side is a graphic and complex collage. The simple map on her side is a great element which complements her story well.

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Then Wendy headed back to Caringbah where she visited James Ruse Agricultural High School

Would you like to see inside the Dairy industry? Or inside “Archie”?

The hero element of Archie is the story itself. All elements of the industry are covered in her concept, with the process line from paddock to product being the ‘inside’ story. The working milk pump is a star, as is her interactivity. Her vibrant colours stand out and she is fun and playful. She has features all over to make the viewer smile.

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Archibull Prize judging week 2 We’ve been everywhere man

Week 2 of the Archibull Prize judging saw Wendy travel from the Central Coast to the Blue Mountains then to Melbourne and then to the eastern suburbs of Sydney.

Wendy’s visit north attracted great interest from the media that included print, radio and TV ( I will endeavour to  get copies to add to this blog)

First off the mark was Northlakes High School where Wendy and I were highly entertained by the Archie team who designed and created Miss Jay Jay

This is what Wendy had to say about Miss Jay Jay

To anyone who studies art, “Miss Jay Jay” has many elements that should be familiar.

Her appropriated artworks are instantly recognisable, and all work together to tell her clever story. Chagall, Picasso, Arkley, Warhol and Jeffrey Smart provide a vibrant canvas to showcase the beef industry. Her visual appeal and her connection to her community are shouted to the viewer, and her layers of complexity shine.

Check out Miss Jay Jay’s journey here

Meet the clever team

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Archibull Prize judging shows the Beef capital salute the grain industry

Week one Day 4 of 2014 Archibull Prize saw judge Wendy fly to Rockhampton from Townsville then catch the next  whirlwind flight to Brisbane

First of the rank was Rockhampton Girls Grammar School’s bovine masterpiece “Hora” is a goddess.

Her simple and vibrant banding is beautifully complemented by her intricate overlaid patterns. Her unique view of the grain industry and its origins and export patterns is clever and highly original. The consistent golden links to ancient civilizations works well and gives a sense of cohesion and character. Her tactile wings create a beautiful sense of balance.

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Wendy then caught the Archibull Prize Express to catch up with the dynamo Margie Keates and her team at Bulimba State School where there was no mistaking “Miss Steak”.

She is a striking mix of city and country and tells us about the Grain industry through collaged imagery and texture. The student faces looking out the cityscape windows is a beautiful and unique element. It captures their involvement in the project and their enthusiasm for her.

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Week One Day Three Sees the Art judge travel to the Burdekin

Day 3 of Week One of the 2014 Archibull Prize official judging tour saw art judge Wendy Taylor fly to Townsville and cross the crocodile infested Burdekin Rive to visit Charters Towers and judge the cotton themed masterpieces created by All Souls St Gabriels and Cloncurry State School

Check out the students artworks and see what Wendy has to say

All Souls St Gabriels Charters Towers 

“Cotton Eyed Josie” is all bull.

A mechanabull, a technologibull, a sustainabull and a recyclabull. This is a cow that has taken to the air, to tell a story of cotton. The unique story is told through stylised patterns and vibrant colour, all anchored in the cotton industry. Her aerial viewpoint intrigues, while at the same time she is anchored to the earth and the industry which inspired her.

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The students at All Souls would also like to share with you some of their special highlights from their journey

Women of the World - QRRRWN – Jane Milburn

Students involved: senior female students

 Martin’s Documentary 

Students involved: 9/10 Arts (Music and Media)

Cotton By the Numbers

Students involved: 10 advanced Maths

Me, Myself and Cotton

Students involved: Chloe Campbell

Reporting on sustainability of irrigation and genetics of cotton

Students involved: 11 AgHort

Sustainability

Students involved: 8 Health

Power Point Presentations - Growth Cycle and Genetics

Students involved: 10 Science

Cloncurry State School is a further seven hours drive down the road from Charters Towers and we send them our heart felt appreciation for bringing their cow to All Souls where it is proudly on display in the front foyer of the school

Cloncurry State School

“ISAbella” quite literally tells the viewer a story.

The story of cotton is shouted through facts about the industry drawn on denim patches and through the gorgeous myth about the farmer and the nymph. A picture is clearly painted through text, to showcase the industry and to highlight its sustainability features.

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