Check out what the Crawford Fund is offering students in 2018

This post in a replica from The Crawford Fund website see here

The Crawford Fund has a number of strategies as part of our efforts to build the next generation of Australian researchers with an interest in agriculture for development – key elements are our conference scholar program, our opportunities and encouragement in volunteering for projects overseas, and through our work with Researchers in Agriculture for International Development (RAID).

Crawford Fund.jpg

 

Each of these go some way to encourage students in their study, careers and volunteering in research for food security. This is part of our overall campaign for greater recognition of the impact and benefit of international agricultural research and development to Australia and to developing countries.

Another important strategy has been the introduction of special awards to enable involvement in overseas projects as part of university study.

In 2017, many of our State Committees supported visits to developing countries by students, so they can gain valuable experience and expertise overseas ‘in the field’. 14 awards were provided in 2017, and each of the students have reported back on their experience:

Kendra Travaille, PhD Researcher at the University of Western Australia,

“Being able to visit these areas and speak with local people in the fishery [industry] has greatly increased my understanding of how the fishery [industry] operates and some of the issues impacting FIP progress. I also gained first-hand experience with some of the challenges faced when trying to implement a FIP or similar program in a developing region, including working with minimal resources and balancing complex stakeholder interests. These insights will be incorporated into my research and published in the peer-review literature. Research outcomes will also be presented to the fishery stakeholders in Honduras who so kindly shared their knowledge and experience with me during my time there.”

Emily Lamberton, Graduate Research Officer at ACIAR

“It created a fantastic opportunity to learn first-hand the struggles and barriers experienced by farmers and the factors that influence on-farm decision making.”

Based on the success of our former awards, in 2018 all of our committees are offering these awards so students in every State and Territory have access to this great opportunity.

Requirements in different States are not the same. There is a different number of these competitive awards in different States, and the application requirements and the award amounts also differ, so please read the background information and complete the application form for the State in which your tertiary institute is located.

Please find more information and application forms below for each State. A contact is provided should you require more clarification.

The closing date for all awards is Thursday, 29 March 2018.

All the very best of luck! In the meantime, please sign up for our e-newsletter, follow us on Twitter and Facebook and follow RAID so you don’t miss any other interesting opportunities and get-togethers. In particular, in March 2018 we will be launching our 2018 Conference Scholarships.

 

Check out the website for more info here

 

Teachers are the key to promoting careers in agriculture – its time to engage them using 21st Century creativity

We have all heard stories about teachers discouraging students from following career pathways in the agriculture sector. The good news is its not too  hard to reverse this trend.

Year on year The Archibull Prize evaluation shows us the key to success is exposing teachers and students to exciting young professionals working in the agriculture sector. It is also pivotal agriculture provides them with the tools to workshop the diversity of careers. A key hook for both teachers and students is the innovation, science and technology that drives 21st century farming.

YFC (12).jpg

Students and teachers relate to exciting young professionals working in the agriculture sector 

Its clear focusing on the narrative of farmers as old grey haired men is not doing us any favours. The Archibull Prize program entry surveys show us students struggle to identify careers in the sector beyond farming related activities despite 82% of careers in agriculture supporting farmers behind and beyond the farmgate. Most of the students words were about activities that farmers did i.e. feeding, harvesting, gardening, shearing, milking, watering.

Careers students before.jpg

By the end of the competition students have a specific and varied repertoire related to actual career classifications rather than jobs around the farm. This is evident with more technical words being used i.e. agronomist, vet, engineer, scientist, geneticist.

Careers Students After

With a large cohort of our Young Farming Champions being scientists and agronomists  their impact is evident through the high numbers of students who listed ‘Agronomist’ or  ‘Scientist’ role. This is further confirmed as students listed their top three choices of careers in agriculture they would consider.

Careers students would chose

Students as the end of The Archibull Prize were asked to list their top three choices of careers in agriculture 

With 89% of teachers in The Archibull Prize exit survey saying they were now confident  teaching about careers in Agriculture and a 52% increase in the number of teachers who STRONGLY AGREED there are lots of opportunities for  jobs and careers in agriculture its clear we have found a winning formulaThe Archibull Prize evaluation Careers Teacher Response

The Archibull Prize program design allows agriculture to be embedded into the school curriculum across subject areas its hasn’t been traditionally able to reach. After participating in the program 83% of teachers said they would use learning activities about agriculture in other areas of their teaching.

Teachers have a major impact on student learning and career choices. Imagine the ripple effect potential replicating The Archibull Prize model across Australia?

_2017 Supporting partners Capture

 

The Archibull Prize now open to Central Qld secondary schools

The annual Archibull Prize program is now open for secondary schools in Central Queensland.

Competing for cash prizes and the national title of Grand Champion, participating schools will research the Australian cotton industry while creatively transforming life-size fibreglass cows into amazing agricultural inspired artworks.

Beaudesert and Costa LR

Which Cotton School will meet Costa in 2018

Blacktown Girls HS (1)

Schools also create a suite of digital multimedia communications and are paired with Young Farming Champions who visit schools, taking the farm straight into the classroom.

As a former participant in The Archibull Prize, Central Queensland agriculture extension specialist Sharna Holman says she appreciates the opportunities the program gave her.

Sharna now works in the cotton industry for the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (QDAF) and CottonInfo as a Regional Extension Officer and continues to be involved with The Archibull Prize by speaking with participating schools.

“Being involved in the Archibull Prize while at high school gave me a better understanding of where my food and fibre came from and highlighted the exciting pathways and careers available in cotton.” Ms Holman says.

“I’m looking forward to visiting schools in the region in 2018 to talk with students about the Australian cotton industry and share the passion and stories young people have for the industry and agriculture.’

Participation in The Archibull Prize is a chance for students and educators to put their school on the map, with the 2017 National Grand Champion winner travelling from Brisbane to the iconic Sydney Royal Easter Show to the halls of the NSW Parliament.

“Over the past seven years The Archibull Prize has engaged more than 160,000 students in conversations about agriculture and consistently shown that the students involved were deeply engaged in a range of learning experiences,” says Archibull Prize program director, Lynne Strong.

“Teachers saw the impacts first-hand of a successful combination of arts and multimedia activities, along with STEM project-based learning activities across multiple key learning areas. Put simply, The Archibull Prize is a successful addition to any learning program.”

Cotton Australia CEO Adam Kay says the organisation has proudly supported the Archibull program for many years.

“The Archibull Prize is a fantastic way to inform young people and educators about our industry and farming in general,” Mr Kay says. “When coupled with the Young Farming Champions program, we have a powerful way to engage with future and current generations about the value of the cotton industry and agriculture as a whole.”

“We encourage schools NSW and Queensland to participate in this extremely worthwhile program and look forward to seeing the products of their efforts on proud display.”

James Kanaley

Teachers and  students will be inspired by Cotton Young Farming Champions like James Kanaley 

Watch the video and hear what teachers are saying they value about The Archibull Prize

Visit our website and view the winning entries in our Hall of Fame 

For more information or to complete an Expression of Interest Contact Program Director Lynne Strong

E: lynnestrong@art4agriculture.com.au M: 0407 740 446

_2017 Supporting partners Capture

 

 

 

 

 

War on Waste – Gerringong Public School catapults Captain Koala onto the national stage

“With the amount of waste increasing in Australia by nearly 8% a year, it’s time for us, as a nation, to seriously re-examine the ways we consume and dispose of consumer items?’ 

GERRINGONG PUBLIC SCHOOL IS BUILDING ON THE SUCCESS OF THEIR GRAND CHAMPION KREATIVE KOALA COMMUNITY PROJECT AND TAKING THEIR LEARNINGS NATIONALLY WITH AN INVITATION TO BE A MODEL SCHOOL IN SERIES TWO OF ABC TV ‘WAR ON WASTE’

Gerringong Public School and science teacher Sue Hassler catapulted themselves into the pilot program of Kreative Koalas with an unmatched enthusiasm to learn more about recycling and waste management, and in doing so won the award for best community project.

KREATIVE KOALAS LOW RES (3 of 56)

Their creation combined their artwork, Captain Koala, with a TerraCycle Drop-off point. “Our project is unique because we have combined our koala into our community project,” the school said. “We have turned this object into a purposeful and decorative addition to our school. We hope to inspire better knowledge of and involvement in recycling, especially through the provision of this collection point for hard to recycle items such as toothbrushes, Nescafe coffee pods and pump dispensers.” Last year we collected over 60,000 Terracycle items which the school receives 1 cent per item for, this money comes back into the school to help with our sustainability work.

Gerringong Koala.jpg

Gerringong Public School won $500 for their efforts but the longer-term applications of their learnings are what makes this such as successful project.

Gerringong Public School was supported by legends local artist Penny Sadubin and Sustainability Ambassador Jaime Lovell through their Kreative Koala journey

During the Kreative Koalas journey the school participated in a plastics audit and was astounded to collect 822 pieces of plastic including chip packets, snap lock bags, clingwrap, foil and muesli bar wrappers. A second audit found an additional 494 pieces of plastic in the school’s water easement. These plastics became the focus of the school’s war on waste.

Gerringong Public Waste Collection.jpg

“I realized that every syllabus or curriculum had an underpinning in sustainability and nearly every topic had some direct content related to the environment,” Mrs Hassler said.  “I showed the students Mission Blue with Sylvia Earle, and then we talked about plastics; their break-down periods, where they come from and why they are a problem. Then we looked at their lunchboxes and how we could minimise plastics in them. We saw a huge change in lunchboxes and there is now a lot less clingwrap, for example, coming into the school.”

Gerringong Public School then overhauled their bin system. Now waste is separated into paper, foil and hard plastics, Terracycle (chip and muesli bar packets)and landfill. “With a school of 430 kids we’ve gone from filling 21 landfill bins each week to four and they are usually only a quarter full,” Mrs Hassler said.

image007.jpg

In addition, the students made beeswax wraps as an alternative to cling wrap and Ziploc plastic bags, which can take five hundred years to break down. So successful was this part of their war on waste that parents began asking for after-school workshops to make their own. The school canteen also came on board with eco-cups, metal spoons and a reduction in the use of foil, and recycling bins were put in the staff room and library.

The school has been very successful in educating and engaging their local community using Facebook, school newsletters and their local newspaper The Bugle with Captain Koala now becoming a community teracycle facility

“It’s an ongoing process of watching what the waste is and it takes a long time for people to understand that what you’re doing is important,” Mrs Hassler said. “There’s no point in teaching literacy and numeracy if we’ve wrecked our environment in the meantime. It becomes about starting independent action with nine and ten-year olds and that’s just gold for me. I’ve got kids who’ll come to me and say, ‘On the weekend, we picked up all these plastics on the beach’ and I feel like they do get it and they’re implementing it in their own lives and making a difference.”

Gerringong Public School is a shining example of the power of collaboration to take courageous steps to create change. Though driving of change may start with one champion, it is the movement, and in this case the students who are everyone’s future, who will make it a reality.

Kreative Koalas focus of collaborating with thought leaders who back the next generation of young people who are going to rethink the world and create a better future is something we can all be involved in and be proud of.

See what all our Courageous Kreative Koala schools are doing here 

Watch this space for more on the adventures of Captain Koala

A strong biosecurity system – ‘Come Clean,Go Clean’ a winning formula

Tail of Pigs – The winner of The Archibull Prize 2017 Best Biosecurity Animation was Little Bay Community of Schools

The NSW Government sees a strong biosecurity system as vital for protecting our primary industries, our economy and our community.

Agricultural production alone provides:

  • $12 Billion NSW Primary Industries contribution to the economy
  • 39,000 Agricultural businesses in NSW
  • 42,000 Farms in NSW
  • 66,000 People employed in NSW Agriculture Industry
  • $8 billion value of NSW Agricultural exports

With a vision of Government, industry and the people of NSW working together to protect the economy, environment and community from the negative impacts of animal and plant pests, diseases and weeds for the benefit of all, the government is investing heavily in education programs for farmers and the community including schools.

Concepts relating Biosecurity are considered by school teachers to be complex. The Archibull Prize gives students a concrete mechanism for these very abstract ideas. Using farmers as role models and agricultural examples students are encouraged to appreciate the ways in which farmers are actively addressing biosecurity challenges in Australia and to think about applying this to themselves.

Biosecurity was an issue that 91% of students reported discussing during their Archibull Prize projects with half of those students looking at the topic in-depth

Teachers reported significant shifts in students gaining greater understandings of farmers concerns about biosecurity and the community’s role in preventing biosecurity breaches

Students were particularly inspired by the Cotton Industry ‘Come Clean Go Clean’ program and the concept of the pork industry Pig Pass.

Typical students’ comments about their role in preventing biosecurity breaches included

We need to keep our country free of disease and pests. This can only be done if every single person tries to follow the rules that are put in place to keep Australia bio secure. Students can help be bio secure by respecting the regulations and restrictions on other people’s farms and obeying the rules of our border security. We should wear clean shoes and have clean cars. Remove weeds and don’t drop them in areas where that weed isn’t already growing. Look after their own pets and keep parasites from spreading from them.

The Archibull Prize design allows agriculture to be embedded into the school curriculum across subject areas its hasn’t been traditionally able to reach.

And its had a ripple effect with 83% of teachers saying they will use learning activities about agriculture in other areas of their teaching

 

dpi-award-hurlstone1.jpg

dpi-award-hurlstone2

Hurlstone Agricultural High School took our the winning biosecurity entries with these phenomenal infographics in 2016 

Check out these tongue in cheek biosecurity adventures of our very own Young Farming Champion biosecurity expert  Sharna Holman here

 

_2017 Supporting partners Capture

What teachers value most about participating in The Archibull Prize

Blacktown and Costa

Expressions of interest are now open for The Archibull Prize 2018. Make the finals and you too can meet Costa

We have listened and delivered. After a three week judging tour, over 40 video interviews and written teacher case studies we are sharing the secret to success.  See The Archibull Prize teacher insights page here. As you can see the definition of success varies greatly

We asked our Lead Teachers questions like.

What are the highlights of being involved in The Archibull Prize?

The growth and the confidence you see in the students and the pride they take in it. How can, as a teacher, you not engage in a project that embraces the students so thoroughly? How can you not give them the opportunity to experience something they
take great pride in, that they work above and beyond in, and they’re prepared to give up their time and stay back till 5pm of an afternoon? How can you say no to that?

Jillian Reidy The Henry Lawson High School

The highlights are seeing how engaged and enthusiastic the kids are, and the relationships you develop with them through collaboration and teamwork. Our whole class presents our work, meaning the kids have to get up in front of their peers and they gain such confidence from that. The kids get a real growth through the Archibull – and it’s fun! Teachers and parents all love it.

Tracy Devlin Gwynneville Public School

What outcomes have you seen beyond a painted cow?

  • We have seen many layers of upskilling of students and educators to work in a large collaborative team on a STEAM project
    • Project Based Learning in action and on a public forum
    • The Archibull has been influential in St Raphael’s decision to teach agriculture as a subject from 2018 for the first time.

Inel Date St Raphaels Catholic School Cowra

Can you tell me two things you have learnt about the industry you studies that you didn’t know before The Archibull Prize?

What stood out for all of us were the career opportunities available in the industry – for example we had never given any thought to what an agronomist was. The other highlight was the impact cotton has on the community. I kept asking the girls “What would we do if we didn’t have the cotton industry?

Khanthamala Gifford Blacktown Girls High School

Our Young Farming Champion Peta Bradley told us that wool absorbs odours. She told us of a guy who wore the same woollen shirt for 27 days and it still wasn’t smelly at the end of it!

Melinda Adderly Granville Boys High School

What is the impact of the Young Farming Champions visit on your students?

It’s very important to get the Young Farming Champions into the school as soon as possible, because the kids are literally sitting there thinking that a farmer is going to be some old guy in a hat with straw hanging out of his mouth. So, when they see these young, dynamic people and they’re like, “Whoa, what? You’re a farmer?” It shocks me. It happens every year and they’re still doing that because they don’t know. It really opens their eyes up

Sarah Robinson Matraville Sports High School

Dione Howard was really amazing. Its fantastic to see young women in agriculture. Being a young person off the land, the ideas that she could share, it was very real. It was so cool for the kids to meet her and hear about her life. 

Lisa Bullas Calvary Christian College Carbrook Campus

Now is your chance to sign up and be a part of The Archibull Prize 2018.  Send me an email for an EOI at lynnestrong@art4agriculture.com.au

The Archibull Prize 2018 coming to a school near you????? Expressions of Interest now open

Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, tasking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes and having fun

The Archibull Prize is a world-renowned art and multimedia competition focusing on the theme of ‘Feeding, Clothing, Housing and Powering a Hungry Nation is a Shared Responsibility’.

This innovative and fun STEM project based learning program is an agricultural and environmental themed art competition for primary and secondary student groups

The Archibull Prize program:

  • Brings the farm into the classroom
  • Introduces students to young people working in the agriculture sector
  • Provides opportunities for students to gain knowledge and skills about the production of the food they eat, fibres they use and the environment they live
  • Creates an opportunity for students to work together to create an amazing artwork that tells the story of agriculture
  • Builds relationships between schools, industry, business and the community
  • Raises awareness of exciting career
  • Fosters two-way conversations and builds lifelong relationships between consumers and farmers

Competing for cash prizes and the national title of Grand Champion, participating schools research a food or fibre industry while creatively transforming life-size fibreglass cows into amazing agricultural inspired artworks.

Schools also create a suite of digital multimedia communications and are paired with Young Farming Champions who visit schools, taking the farm and their career  straight into the classroom.

Being a part of The Archibull Prize is a chance to put your school on the map, with the 2017 National Grand Champion winner travelling from the iconic Sydney Royal Easter Show to the halls of the NSW Parliament.

Over the past seven years The Archibull Prize has engaged over 160,000 students in agricultural conversations and learning experiences. Teachers saw first-hand the impact of  a successful combination of arts and multimedia activities, across multiple key learning areas. Put simply, The Archibull Prize is a successful addition to any learning program.

Visit our website and view the winning entries in our Hall of Fame.

For more information or to complete an Expression of Interest contact Program Director Lynne Strong:  lynnestrong@art4agriculture.com.au

 

_2017 Supporting partners Capture