Art4Agriculture founder & rural change maker wins 2015 Merial Howard W Yelland Award

The Art4Agriculture team and Young Farming Champions are thrilled to announce…

The 2015 Merial Howard W Yelland Award for service to the Australian beef industry was today presented to rural and social entrepreneur and Jamberoo farmer Lynne Strong for her outstanding contribution to the improvement of Australia’s beef industry.

Lynne is the first woman to win the Merial Howard W Yelland Award, which recognises her “role as a pioneer in the development of the Art4Agriculture initiative and the Young Farming Champions program” and her “passionate advocacy of the role which agriculture and agricultural communities have in the Australian economy.”

The award acknowledges Lynne’s commitment to providing a strong connection between agricultural industries, food supply chains and consumers. The Art4Agriculture and the Young Farming Champions programs have given students in urban schools a “link to the land” and a focussed image of the role of Australian agriculture in sustainable food production, ensuring that Australian livestock producers are promoted as committed and responsible users of natural resources at the forefront of world’s best livestock practice.

Lynne said the award was a ground-breaking acknowledgement that what farmers do beyond the farm gate in the 21st century is just as vital as what they do behind it.

“If we are going to ensure a healthy and vibrant future for Australian families and Mother Nature – agriculture must be a partnership between farmers and the whole community,” Lynne said.

“This award is the beef industry saying we are proud of what we do, we have great stories to tell and we want to share our stories with the world,” she said.

“Most importantly this award is a salute to all the Young Farming Champions who are breaking new ground and starting a movement to help agriculture have the courageous conversations we all need to have to ensure we build lifelong and powerful partnerships of trust between farmers and the community.”

The award is presented by the Australian Beef Industry Foundation (ABIF) in conjunction with Marcus Oldham College, Geelong and is supported by Merial Australia. Selection criteria for the award includes: Recognition of extent of their contribution to the Australian beef industry; Recognition of their contribution both nationally and internationally; Leadership role as a change agent; and Contribution above their normal role in the industry.

Well done Lynne, from all the Young Farming Champions and team!

Lynne Strong with Young Farming Champions and Winner of 2014 Archibull Prize

Grain farmer, ag-science student and storyteller Hugh Burrell loves to share a yarn from the farm

The bush is in Hugh Burrell’s blood and farming has been his calling since the day dot. He’s a 4th generation farmer, a 4th year Agricultural Science student and a proud product of Narrabri, NSW. At boarding school in Sydney, Hugh was known for enthralling his boarding house mates with his wild and entertaining “Yarns from the Farm”… perhaps little has changed, because today’s guest blog is a great read!

Let’s hand it over to you, Hugh…

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2390: numbers I will never forget. Now that you know all my passwords I’d better let you know who I am. I’m Hugh Burrell, a 4th generation born farmer from Narrabri, NSW. My father is a farmer, my grandfather was a farmer and my great grandfather was a farmer. I am the youngest born of my family, with an older brother and sister. We were all raised on our family property “Woodlands” north east of Narrabri, nestled in the foothills of the Nandewar ranges. Being a family farm spanning many generations we have been involved in a variety of operations from pigs, chooks, sheep, cattle, grains, cotton, to canola and dogs. However my fondest memories come from our days as mixed cropping and cattle producers. These formative years of my life spent trailing, with poddy calf in tow, my grandfather, father and brother around the rich basalt soils checking for weeds in the wheat and pulling out black oats to feed to my poddy lambs at home, are some memories that I still reminisce about today.

With my father and grandfather at the helm of the business when I was growing up, we began a more intensive winter cropping regime. We went from running merino sheep for wool and fattening lambs on oats to a full blown wheat and barley operation. The days spent with “Grampa” on the old Chamberlain tractor pushing up rocks to clear the way for Dad to come through and plant wheat are fresh in my memory. Growing up meant extra work for me, as I grew into my gangly frame I was more useful with jobs like fencing and weed chipping, which my father knew and used to his advantage. However, something he came to learn was that I loved this work, hands on learning, out in the open, and providing something for the world to eat.

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Interested Locals

Heading off to Narrabri Public School saw this idea of working outside flourish, where my teacher was often heard calling, “Hugh, what are you doing out here?” to which I would show her the perfectly cultivated rows of the sandpit and reply, “Just farming.” This became a more frequent response as the years went on and this “just farming” idea became a driving force.

We began leasing a property on the other side of town to our farm, so during the week Grampa would pick me up from school and we’d head out to check the sorghum, wheat, and mungbeans we grew out there. During the summer we would take turns scaring the birds off the ripe sorghum heads while recounting our day to each other, being a quite kid I just listened to the stories. This seemingly endless time spent driving around the crops, refilling the tractor, checking for weeds and talking to each other was the foundation of my passion for farming. The nature of a family farm is essential to agriculture throughout the world; the care that is taken with each step and the knowledge that can be transferred between generations is a vital part of our industry.

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A few wheat bix

Growing into my brother’s clothes it was time to ship off to boarding school. I was 11, and my first day of school at The Scots College was only my second ever visit to Sydney. This was another foundational experience for me, the place where I met some of my closest mates to this day and that fostered my rural blood. Being one of 200 or so country boys in a school of 1000, it’s fair to say we stuck out. Our city friends often quizzed us about our holiday activities, to which I loved telling stories of the farm, harvesting, mustering, spraying and everything else that we got up to. Talking to others about farming – some who were almost oblivious to the facts – was great fun for me, I loved getting up in front of the boarding house on our first night back after the holidays to recite “Yarns from the Farm.”

Moving along at school, I studied Biology and Business Studies in the hope of pursuing a career on our family farm, continuing my forefather’s tradition. However, with some succession decisions still in the pipeline and my dream of heading home to “Woodlands” stalled for the time being, I knew uni would be a great opportunity. I ended up at Sydney University enrolled in Agricultural Science, which has been a great experience for me, instilling a respect for research and its part in agriculture, particularly in Australia.

Throughout my degree I have been lucky enough to be involved in various field trips around NSW, learning from others in the industry about how they apply science to their farms and businesses. This has really nailed down the point of agricultural research, which I am dedicated to use in my career in agriculture. In my third year of study I was involved in the Developing Agriculture in Developing Countries unit which involved a three week trip through Laos, South East Asia. We were able to meet with multinational companies, non-government organizations and government bodies to talk about the impact that agricultural development has on a developing a country. This was an amazing experience, from planting rice with the locals to hiking through the rugged limestone cliffs; it was a true example that agriculture can take you anywhere.

Hugh Burrell_Rice planting in Laos

Rice planting in Laos

I am now in my 4th year of study with a focus on agronomy and precision agriculture. I’m looking to undertake my honours research project in 2016 in the grain production area, centred on crop and variety selection and management in the Narrabri area.

I’ve been working every summer holidays with Australian Grain Technologies (AGT) in Narrabri, helping harvest the trial crops, seed cleaning, and hand harvesting for 3 weeks in December 2014 at 40oc – that was a true experience. This work has truly highlighted the importance of plant breeding for select region specific traits that give farmers that little bit extra ability to grow more crop per hectare and per mega-litre, especially in these challenging climatic times.

I have a passion for agriculture that has been fostered from birth. Being brought up in a region built on farming, it’s safe to say it’s in my blood. I am really looking forward to the challenges ahead of my honours project and what the real world holds. One thing I know for sure is that I’ll be back out in the bush soon, chasing the sun all day and growing food for the world – hopefully somewhere out around postcode 2390.

Cheers, Hugh Burrell

Searching for agriculture’s rockstars

Rural and social entrepreneur Josh Gilbert who is also Chair of NSW Young Farmers and an Art4Agriculture Young Farming Champion is looking for help and he needs you to help him source agriculture’s rockstars

Tractor Talks

Josh is putting a call out to the community looking for agriculture’s rockstars to join him in spreading the great stories of agriculture that inspire while fostering innovation and breaking down the existing silo’s within agriculture via his newest venture Tractor Talks.

Too often in agriculture we sit around and find ourselves protecting one tree, while watching the fire burn down the forest around us.  I want to showcase a cohort of people who can help me show how others are  changing this culture’

Tractor Talks is a really great opportunity to showcase people who have new and exciting ideas and are leading the way and can inspire others. We need a huge shift away from the negative culture stereotypical stories that hinder progression, new thinking and self-pride.

It’s a great platform to listen to on the go and I really hope it serves as an incubator for agricultural innovation. I want a beef farmer to hear what an oyster grower is doing and think- we could apply something similar in our industry. I want a young farmer to hear that there is a light at the end of the tunnel and that people have succeeded from similar backgrounds. And what I really want most is for the podcast to help draw people together, as one united industry right around the world…… says Josh

To kick-start his journey and give him added confidence that others believe in his ideas Josh has been announced as a 2015 Young Social Pioneers (YSP) scholarship awardee for Tractor Talks. You can listen to the first episode HERE

Via this article in The Land

Passionate youth agriculture advocate Josh says  “Tractor Talks is designed to tell agriculture’s exciting stories and encourage other farmers with innovative ideas and great stories to get involved and be stars of their own success stories,” Josh said.

Now on  iTunes the Tractor Talks podcast will feature interviews with successful and inspiring agricultural professionals, exploring their motivations, industry visions and practical tips for farmers across a broad range of business and farming topics.

Josh’s YSP scholarship, sponsored by Optus, will see him take part in three residential touchpoints in Sydney. Alongside 49 other Pioneers he’ll connect with experts who provide support to amplify Tractor Talks, build networks of support and develop business skills and capabilities to drive a successful, purpose-driven venture.

The program is an initiative of The Foundation for Young Australians and supports Australia’s best and brightest emerging young change-makers: social innovators, thought leaders and entrepreneurs.

Josh said the networking, mentoring and the chance to take home $10,000 in seed funding make the scholarship a once in a lifetime opportunity.

“There is also the opportunity to get nationwide publicity, which is essential in sharing great agricultural stories with our consumers and the world,” he said.

Josh is looking forward to being inspired at the touchpoint sessions.

“I think it’s going to be a great way to ensure that Tractor Talks remains relatable to the general public, while also keeping the agricultural messages and tips at the podcast’s core,” he said.

“Connecting with 49 great minds from across the country is more than I could have ever wished for. This makes the whole course a great experience, along with the opportunity to change aspects of Australian life and be a part of the exciting Australian start-up scene.”

The first Tractor Talks podcast will showcase Liverpool Plains farmers and founders of ‘The Conscious Farmer’ beef brand Derek and Kirrily Blomfield.

Josh is a role model to all generations in agriculture, his passion, commitment and motivation is something we can all aspire to. He recognises the importance of and grabs every opportunity to cultivate influential community partnerships for the best outcomes for youth in agriculture.

CALL TO ACTION: If you know one of agriculture’s rockstars whose story will inspire others by featuring on Tractor Talks Josh wants to talk to you

Contact Josh Gilbert

Email: contact@gilbertjoshuam.com

Mobile: 0432 260 024.

Twitter:    #agrockstars

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TractorTalks/

Tractor Talks

Hannah Powe’s heart and home is wherever there are cows

Today’s guest blog from Hannah Powe is a story about following your passion and grabbing opportunities with both hands. Hannah’s love of beef cattle has taken her from New South Wales to New Zealand and through the cattle country of Canada and the US. Wherever she is, Hannah will be happy as long as there are cows!

Here’s Hannah’s story…

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“Some folks just don’t get it. They think owning cattle makes no sense. It takes too much time, too much equipment, not to mention the expense. But the fondest memories of my life – they might think sound funny – were made possible by Mum and dad, ‘cause they spent the time and they spent the money. You see, the most important lessons helping values grow so strong, come from loving cattle and passing that tradition on” – The Tradition

Hi, my name is Hannah Powe and I’ve spent my life surrounded by motivated, encouraging and passionate people who all love the same thing I do: Beef Cattle.

My interest in agriculture has grown from those people, along with the support and drive of my mum and dad. Growing up in the Hawkesbury region of NSW my family primarily grew mushrooms; beef cows were simply a hobby. But this farm girl always had a desire to make it so much more.

From a young age I remember running around among the cows with my big sister, getting stuck in the mud, playing with calves and travelling across the state to attend shows and visit friends on other farms. The part I loved most was always simply look at and being surrounded by cattle.

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Even though I grew up close to Sydney, I appreciated having such an agricultural based childhood. It made me aware of where our clothes came from, how food was produced and the overall connection and importance of primary producers in the scale of everyday living in Australia.

My decision to pursue a career in agriculture and the beef cattle industry begun at my first Angus Youth Roundup held at Canberra in 2009. Coming from a Murray Grey background – my parents started our stud with primarily Murray Greys in the 1980 – and having little experience in how a heifer show worked, I was surprised by how professional, yet also welcoming and eager, every was. Throughout that weekend I met many people that challenged and motivated me to want to learn more. I placed 3rd in my first ever parader class and gained new friends – many who are still my closest friends today.

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Growing up, I was always a quietly spoken and shy girl. It was a continual struggle for my family and friends to get me to speak in public, especially to take part in a junior judging competition, until I had to associate judge the cattle section at the 2009 Boorowa Show. People that have seen me grow and flourish still remind me of this experience every year, especially when I’m in the position of helping someone younger who faces similar challenges to me. It really grounds me, shows me how far I have come as a person and highlights how lucky I am to be supported by the beef industry and individuals who have helped along the way.

After this there was no looking back, or should I say, no holding me back. I have sought out every opportunity to compete in junior judging competitions as well as had the privilege to associate or judge local shows across the state. Travelling far and wide across Australia and internationally, to represent my breeds and meet likeminded, passionate and encouraging people that fuel my drive to achieve. I am thankful to my family for never holding me back.

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People that know the Powe family, know that it’s a family thing. Our cattle are the glue that sticks us all together. Mum and dad manage our property while my sister and her husband grow the feed that my dad mixes to feed the cattle. When we go to a show or field day each person has their role and even though we probably don’t always seem like it, we are thankful to have each other there.

In 2009 we introduced Red Angus to our herd as the focus breed which has been an exciting and rewarding endeavour, with many major successes.

The next year I moved away to boarding school at Yanco Agricultural High School. My family believed this would help me ‘focus’ but while I did study, I spent every spare moment working with the beef show stock team. I felt Yanco was a place where I belonged – a home away from home, with cows. Being situated on a rural property, surrounded by like-minded agricultural kids from across Australia, and the industry events I was exposed to really pushed me to want so much more.

After school I made the natural choice to study a Bachelor of Agricultural Science at Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga. To gain experience in another part of the red meat production chain, while at uni I challenged myself by taking part in the Intercollegiate Meat Judging Competition (ICMJ).

My hunger to learn about international agriculture and different beef production systems began in 2013 when I had the privilege to compete for Australia in the World Angus Forum (WAF) in New Zealand. The WAF is the pinnacle of the Angus community, bringing people together to celebrate and learn about the breed’s progression worldwide. New Zealand will always be a connection to so many different countries for me; I was lucky enough to meet a network of international delegates which has led to many overseas adventures to areas no one would have imagined.

New Zealand

Directly following the WAF I travelled to Canada for a six week individual travel program. A highlight of the trip was being able to attend Northland’s FarmFair International and Canadian Western Agribition – two of the major stock shows in Canada – as an Australian delegate. I spent time visiting with producers of bulls we use in our production system and saw new and upcoming genetics, all while working in a totally new environment and making another home away from home with cows.

Following my overseas adventure, my interest changed direction and I became more driven to engage, influence and share information with others. Previously being part of the Angus Youth committees, in 2014 I took on the role of communications and promotions director before this year becoming the vice-chairperson. I hope to keep giving back to the programs that encouraged and influenced me. One thing I love is seeing kids grow, develop and become more confident within our industry.

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Recently I chose to explore the other side of our production system – the commercial beef industry. Throughout my summer holidays I worked at JBS Swift Riverina Beef Feedlot located in Leeton, NSW as part of the animal induction team. Busy days made for enjoyable learning about grading cattle going into the feedlot and animal health programs.

In 2014 I was privileged to be awarded the Murray Grey Senior Youth Ambassador that enabled me to undertake an international study trip to Texas A & M University in College Station, Texas. As well as studying subjects in genetics, reproduction and US beef production systems, I had the opportunity to explore the local stock shows and visit world class facilities for reproduction technologies and beef data analysis.

In my six years of involvement in the beef industry, the most significant and memorable moments have come from being surrounded by people that push and challenge me, the wise words of wisdom or support they offer, and the friendships made with families on the holiday show circuit.

But the most rewarding part is the love I have for my animals and the simple joy the cattle bring to my life. Those that know me well, know to not get between Hannah and her cow! My passion for them is never ending.

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The only certain thing I can say about my future is that I know it will be with beef cattle – a passion instilled in me thanks to my family. I am about to undertake my final year work placement at Agricultural Business Research Institute (ABRI) and Animal Genetic Breeding Unit (ABGU) in Armidale, NSW, where I will gain experience in genetics, research and data, and work alongside some of the industry’s great influential minds.

Home is where the cows are and I know no matter where I am in the world I can find refuge in the back blocks surrounded by cattle, enjoying the true agricultural experiences many of us dream about.

Find your passion and follow it says Rozzie O’Reilly

From the family farm to commercial feedlots, today’s guest blog from Rozzie O’Reilly takes us on a journey through what it takes to put a great steak, or lamb chop, on your plate. Rozzie says, “Agriculture is my passion and my life, and this is my journey to date…”

Here is her story…

My agricultural journey began twenty two years ago when I born the daughter of a fourth generation sheep and cattle farmer in the beautiful Riverina of southern NSW. Needless to say, agriculture is in my blood. Our family farming enterprise is no stereotype though. Dad was tragically killed in an accident when I was a toddler, leaving Mum to raise four kids as well as manage her livestock. In addition to running livestock on our small block of land at Narrandera, we primarily agisted stock on surrounding properties.

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Hanging out with some of our cows at home

It was Mum’s determination and courage, as well as her ability to include us kids in the farming enterprise, that lead me to instinctively develop a passion for agriculture and in particular a love for sheep and cattle. From the time I could walk I was in the yards helping Mum draft stock, in the woolshed penning up sheep and rouseabouting, and on the back of the ute helping supplement feed stock. I simply loved getting out and about to help Mum do the daily jobs of producing both food and fibre.

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Helping feed out hay with my brother on the left & feeding poddy lambs on the right.

At the end of Year 12 in 2010, I followed my passion and applied to the University of New England (UNE) in Armidale to complete a Bachelor of Animal Science, majoring in Livestock Production. The following year I moved to Armidale (950km away from home) to begin study and have never looked back since. This was possibly the greatest life decision I have ever made! Throughout the four years of university, not only did I learn a great deal, ranging from livestock nutrition and genetics through to plant pathology (and everything in between), but I was also exposed to an array of amazing opportunities which strengthened my interest in the industry.

During my first year of university I also completed a Certificate IV in Wool Classing at TAFE. Not only did this provide me with a recognised qualification, but it also allowed me to gain work in shearing sheds during holidays to help pay for university fees. At this same time I began taking part in sheep fleece judging and was fortunate enough to compete for the Armidale Show Society at local, regional and state level. Let me tell you, judging fleeces at the Sydney Royal Easter Show is certainly much more stressful than the home woolshed, but nonetheless very enjoyable and a great networking and learning experience.

In 2012 I competed for UNE at the Intercollegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition, which is an annual conference that exposes university students to all sectors of the red meat industry. While training for the competition I learnt how to assess market suitability, meat quality and yield in beef, pork and lamb species. Though getting up early to stand in meat chillers for training does not sound like a hobby nor great fun, I certainly learnt a lot and gained an appreciation for the most important part of the red meat industry: the consumer.

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Me and a fellow UNE team mate judging a beef carcase class.

I was fortunate to be selected as a member of the 2013 Australian ICMJ Team who toured the United States for four weeks. This was an incredible opportunity! Our team competed in three major US meat judging contests, travelled across ten states and gained a unique insight into the US meat and livestock industry through a number of tours. Visits included the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the USDA Meat Animal Research Centre, three major US packers, as well as feedlot, ranch and retail visits. Essentially, the tour was a complete paddock to plate insight into the US, and allowed comparisons between Australia and the US to be made.

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The 2013 Aussie ICMJ Team in the US; on the left we are outside the JBS Headquarters in Colorado, while on the right is the awards we gained following one of the competitions we competed in.

I am forever grateful for what I have personally gained from my ICMJ experience and would love for as many people as possible to gain what I did. To help achieve this, I co-coached UNE ICMJ teams for two years following my participation and am now currently a committee member of the Australian ICMJ committee. My role on the committee is Careers Expo Coordinator, which is something I am very passionate about as the youth of today are inevitably our future.

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2014 UNE ICMJ Team which I was lucky enough to be a part of the coaching team.

Another wonderful opportunity was the 2014 Indonesian Beef Production Tour, a three week tour coordinated by the University of Adelaide. It was certainly was an eye opener, giving a fantastic insight into each sector of the supply chain in which Australian cattle are exposed to in Indonesia. A significant highlight of the trip was visiting one of TUM’s new abattoirs (TUM is the company that was exposed on Four Corners, which lead to the closure of live export to Indonesia in 2011). The new facility clearly demonstrated that animal welfare is of utmost importance. This had a great positive impact on me, as it is quite contradictory to how live export to Indonesia is portrayed by a number of groups in Australia. Ultimately, this experience gave me the confidence to be able to promote live export upon returning to Australia.

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2014 Indonesian Beef Production Tour; left is a research feedlot we visited, while on the right I am pictured with Febrina, an Indonesian Animal Science university student.

During my final year of university I undertook an Honours research trial in the field of sheep genetics. I tried to determine whether sires re-rank, in terms of their performance, in different environments. Honours certainly was not a ‘walk in the park’; I analysed tens of thousands of data recordings and spent hours in front of the computer. However, the process was rewarding and I gained a very strong appreciation for scientific research, and now understand the vital importance of research to our agricultural industry. I concluded the project with some significant results, which I found exciting and motivating… (and maybe one day I’ll be back to complete a PhD). Overall, I was awarded First Class Honours for my project.

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Pictured with Mum after graduating with a B. Animal Science (1st Class Honours).

I was very fortunate for the support of a number of financial bursaries to help fund my degree including the UNE Country Scholarship and the NSW Royal Agricultural Society Foundation Scholarship. I also gained an Horizon Scholarship for the duration of my degree, which not only financially supported me but also aided in leadership, personal and professional development, supported attendance to industry conferences which broadened my agricultural knowledge, as well as organised annual industry work placements. This wonderful program enabled me to broaden my networks and certainly helped shape the person I am today.

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Attending the 2014 Northern Australia Food Futures conference in Darwin as a Horizon Scholar delegate.

One particular Horizon work placement proved to be very influential in my career progression. In my second year of university I completed work placement at a 32,000 head beef feedlot. Prior to this I had never set foot on a beef feedlot, let alone considered a career in the lot feeding industry. This placement completely changed my perspective of intensive agriculture and I became intrigued with the industry. Since then, I have completed a Feedlot Management unit at university as well as work placement at two other feedlots, and was also fortunate to gain a Meat & Livestock Australia scholarship to attend the 2013 Australian Lot Feeders biannual BeefWorks conference. Most recently though, since finishing university last year, I have begun a Beef Supply Chain trainee position with Kerwee Lot Feeders. This position allows me to combine the knowledge which I have gained at university and through the ICMJ program to help produce tasty beef of the upmost quality. I find this an exciting concept and I am even more excited to see where this role takes me in the future.

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In the pens at Kerwee Feedlot

The world population is continuing to rise at a very fast rate and I believe that intensive farming, such as lot feeding, is going to play a significant role in feeding this ever increasing population. I want to actively help the lot feeding industry to continue moving forward by promoting the importance of high animal welfare and environmental standards, as well as help ensure that lot feeders are up to date with emerging best management practices. Eventually I hope to harness my passion for livestock nutrition and genetics to help maximise production in the most sustainable manner.

Ultimately I wish to be part of the Young Farming Champions program so that I can tell my agricultural story, as well as market, promote and engage consumers with the great products that the Australian agricultural industry produces. I also want to help raise awareness of the diverse range of career opportunities available in agricultural and inspire the young people to consider them.

Australian agriculture is an exciting place to be and has endless amazing opportunities available for people who have drive and passion. So find and follow your passion, seize opportunities and enjoy the ride; you never know where you might end up.

Jamie Thornberry shares his love of agriculture and technology on the farm via twitter

Our guest blog today comes from keen communicator and ag advocate Jamie Thornberry. A trials agronomist with a focus on farmer extension, it’s Jamie’s knack for explaining agronomic concepts and online communication which has allowed his skills to blossom in that difficult line of communication between researcher, farmer and consumer.

This is Jamie’s story….

I remember way back when I was a little tacker in year 3 and we first moved out to the farm in Central West of New South Wales. It was quite different from the small town life that I was used to. For one, my back yard got a hell of a lot bigger. Thinking back I didn’t seem to notice the isolation from my friends as I always had my little fox terrier Muttley by my side. Our farm of 700 acres was relatively small at the time, although at that age I didn’t mind; it was big enough for Muttley and I to go hunting for mice and rabbits.

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Presenting our research at Tottenham Ag expo

Around the same time that we purchased the property between Canowindra and Cudal my Nan and Pop bought a small farm at Cargo. I soon found myself split between the two properties which were two very different farming systems. My Dad had a main focus on wheat production and he spent the majority of his time carting wheat throughout Northern NSW, whereas my Pop decided cattle was the way to go. At that age of course the cows appeared to be more interesting to me, and my pop would always take us to see the new calves.

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Burning research trial plots with a drip torch

As time pressed on we started to work more and more on the farm at Cargo as well as our own. My Dad quickly grew frustrated with the cows walking over pop’s fences so sheep quickly became an alternative. Around that time I was in my final years of high school, with my favourite subject being Agriculture – of course – as well as a touch of biology and a dose of primary industries to get me out of the class room. These subjects built a strong foundation for a university degree in Agriculture.

In 2009 I commenced my Bachelor of Agricultural Science with Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga. I remember making the decision on which university I would attend; I could study agribusiness in Orange just down the road, or completely throw myself out of my comfort zone and travel to Wagga Wagga. In hindsight it was the best decision I have ever made. The degree at CSU was quite diverse, split between agronomy, agribusiness, soil and animal health. This played a large role in shaping me for the industry as well as starving off boredom when tasked with 2000 word assignments. I graduated in 2013 and, like a typical graduate, began the tiring search for my ideal job in the industry.

With the job market a little harsher than I expected, I started part time work as a freelance web designer and online marketer. So there I was with my Ag degree in one hand and a passion for communications in the other. It wasn’t long until I began to bring the two together, noticing there was huge communication breakdown between farmers and the consumers of their products. This led me to Twitter in search of online discussion around agriculture and there built an online network with local agribusinesses.

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Stubble conference in Melbourne

With my ideal media job in mind I applied for a job with Central West Farming Systems (CWFS) as a trials agronomist with a focus on farmer extension. CWFS is an independent, non-for-profit farmer driven organisation delivering agricultural research by farmers, for farmers. Working there I found my career rapidly changed as my role in the team was to play to my strengths in online communications and explaining agronomic concepts.

Looking back at the time when I was deciding on a career path, I think the best advice I could give myself would be a quote from Richard Branson: “If you are presented with a good opportunity and you’re not sure that you have the right skills for it. Say yes and learn the skills later.”

We are in the information age and that gifts us all the tools to learn the skills we need at our fingertips. Looking at the Young Farming Champions program my goal would be to learn the skills I need to build confidence in young agriculturists. While farming in the paddock will always require practical skills, the younger technology driven generation has more to offer the industry than they think. Building communication avenues between farmers and consumers is just one vital step.

To follow what I’m doing, follow my regular updates on Twitter @cwfsystems

Solicitor, farmer and blogger Amy Gullifer wants everyone talking about Ag

Amy Gullifer describes herself as solicitor by day and an aspiring young farmer at all other times. Through advocacy and communication Amy strives to help other people start a conversation, further their understanding of agriculture and get started in the farming sector

This is Amy’s story…

Bathurst, in the Central Tablelands of New South Wales, is the place I call home. Bathurst was put on the map by its internationally renowned racetrack Mount Panorama. To me, the significance of Bathurst has nothing to do with racing and everything to do with agriculture.

Photo from the show 2015..

I grew up on a mixed grazing farm just north of Bathurst under the watchful eye of both parents and all four grandparents. My parents owned and ran a rural merchandise business that was the hub for many people involved in agriculture in region.  My father certainly taught me most things I know about the industry and I have been immeasurably lucky to be brought up under such a forward thinking and moving man.

wether trial

My knowledge and involvement in agriculture has certainly grown and diversified since the above picture (as has my fashion sense) – a direct result of my parents encouraging me to get involved and be the difference that you wish to see. I am now involved in my local show society, Landcare committee, Agricultural Societies Council Next Generation committee and am on an advisory group to the Board of the Central Tablelands Local Lands Service, as well as being a beef producer myself.

Bulls

In an age where information can be shared at the drop of a hat I believe young people moving into agriculture should take advantage of this. For an agricultural community to thrive it must have a high level of connectivity and I think the youth of today are the best people to facilitate networking, communication, and information dissemination between generations.

I remember attending wether trial days, fencing demonstrations or just lunches with my father, or even hosting them at our property and the conversation and interaction would be a bigger focus than the sheep or demonstration themselves. This will always be the way that I will remember my experiences with agriculture and I think there’s something we can take forward from this interactive approach.

Waratah day

I have become involved in quite a few groups that facilitate connectivity, whether that be locally or internationally. The Agricultural Societies Council Next Generation has provided me with an amazing platform to meet people from all over the world. I was lucky enough last year to be the recipient of a scholarship to attend the Royal Agricultural Societies of the Commonwealth Conference in Brisbane, gaining infinite opportunities to network with like-minded people and take in knowledge that I took back to my own enterprise, Show Society and hometown.

HRH

Quite a while ago now, I made the big decision to leave the nest and venture off to university to complete a Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of Environmental Science. University was one of the most eye opening experiences of my life. It really made me aware of the struggle some people had been through and still go through in agriculture but it also made me aware of how strong the industry is, both socially and economically.

I have now completed my double degree and have been admitted to practice in New South Wales as a Solicitor specialising in property and family law.

graduating

My new career move has provided me with a lot of training in communication and advocacy and I wish to channel that into providing easy to digest information to those, both younger or older than me, that wish to get into farming but are not quite sure how to go about it. This desire saw the creation of my blog raisinggreenerpastures.com with the purpose of documenting my journey of getting set up and running as a grazier, offering handy tips in other areas with a focus on sustainability, as well as some light hearted entertainment.

georgie riding

I hope that my journey so far can inspire someone, even if it’s only one person, to pick up a book, to open a link or to have a conversation and further their understanding of agriculture.