Technology in the beef industry has big impact on Richmond High School

After visiting Cranebrook High School we jumped back in the truck ( image is everthing)took the secenic route to Richmond

Art4Agriculuture Young Farming Champion visited Richmond High School situated in outer Western Sydney as part of their Archibull Prize journey to share her story

Alison runs her own agricultural consultancy firm providing on farm technology implementation for farmers

Her area of speciality is NLIS data base management and having engaged her to assist with Clover Hill Dairies NLIS database upgrade I can provide testament she is highly qualified, efficient and in this case a blessing in disguise. Every farmer knows its very important to adhere to strict biosecurity guidelines. But I digress 

The students were also fascinated by the development of the QR code app. See Alison’s presentation to the students for further information     

With Richmond High School students at sport art teacher Simon Wyatt was on hand to share the Richmond High School Archibull Prize journey and the story of “Patti” with the judges. 

What an awesome job he does. He shares the journey with you here

NLIS is the National Livestock Identification System developed to help Australia trace animals, improve market access, and manage disease and residue control issues. In cattle, electronic ear tags or rumen boluses (an electronic tag deposited in the stomach) are used to individually identify and trace their movements in NLIS. By using this method, individual animal movements can be recorded on a central database, enabling fast and accurate tracking of cattle movements for disease or residue-affected animals. The system also provides documentary records of movements, such as waybills and combined NVDs and waybills. 

How does NLIS work?

Because NLIS is both electronic and permanent, individual animals can be traced faster and more accurately than with the previous tail tag and waybill systems. In the event of a disease outbreak, quarantine measures can be deployed faster and with limited costs to industry and government.

The system also allows for faster return to business enabling the rapid removal of suspect infected or contaminated animals. The previous tail tag system tracked cattle from their consignment property to sale or slaughter. Beyond that, tracing relied on paper-based records held on farms or elsewhere.

Where is the demand for NLIS coming from?

Global trends are very clear; our major customers and competitors are rapidly moving towards individual animal identification tracking systems. In 1999, the European Union was the first to require individual animal identification to support hormonal growth promotant (HGP)-free certification. Canada, Japan, Uruguay, and Brazil all have government and industry-backed individual animal tracing systems in place.

Key benefits for the Australian livestock industry

  • reduced financial and social impact of a livestock disease or residue incident due to faster and more accurate livestock identification and traceability
  • being prepared for international customers demanding lifetime traceability
  • maintaining access to overseas markets
  • ensuring domestic and export consumers continue to have confidence in Australian beef and dairy products
  • upholding Australia’s reputation as a producer of safe, wholesome beef and dairy products.

Key benefits for producers

Direct benefits from NLIS depend on how a producer uses the technology in their business. These can include:

  • improved management and breeding decisions by using individual animal performance data linked to carcase feedback to fine tune compliance with customer specifications
  • saving time and more accurate individual animal data due to automated electronic reading
  • improved deterrent to stock theft.

    Richmond High School Archibull prize 2011 Entry "Patti"

 

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