The Farming Narrative will be told – its up to farmers to decide how it will be remembered

Ar4Agriculture’s Young Farming Champion Josh Gilbert’s presentation to the audience at the NSW Department of Primary industry’s workshop on SOCIAL LICENCE TO OPERATE – CONNECTING WITH COMMUNITY answered the question posed by the FarmOn team in their recent blog ‘So are farmers ready to care’ found here

We at Art4agriculture are thrilled that the organisers of the event acknowledged that youth are passionate and committed to doing whatever it takes to get the narrative right and  chose to give youth a voice through Josh to tell their story

Below is an abbreviated version of Josh’s talk

Connecting with the community – the narrative

My name is Joshua Gilbert. I am, a fourth generation Braford breeder on the Mid North Coast of NSW, an area my ancestors have farmed for over 40,000 years. I commenced my law and accounting studies in 2009, with the aim of working in community practice. In the process of studying, I found myself drawn back to agriculture, and recognised that my skills could complement both my on farm operations as well as my fellow farmers.

Josh Gilbert Braford Breeder

My long-term aim is to go back to my family farm. I know that agriculture has changed, and that it now requires high level skills for farmers to be successful in the tough climate we find ourselves in. At a wider level, my background will also help me support farmers to up skill in financial literacy.

I am also completing a law degree with a view to spending some time in policy, and getting a greater understanding of what can be achieved. I also hope this training will ensure that I can add value to policy discussions, and ensure we get the best outcomes for agriculture. I am also considering a career in politics.

As a young person who is passionate about the cattle industry, watching the impact of the Live Export scrutiny on our fellow farmers in the Northern Beef Industry, I realise the greatest threat to sustainable red meat production in this country, is no longer harsh climatic conditions and volatile prices, but rather, whether or not our customers find our farming and animal welfare practices socially acceptable.

I also acknowledge that negative consumer images and perceptions about modern farming practices are seriously threatening farmers’ social licence to operate. I feel very passionate about ensuring I have the knowledge, skill sets and a team of people-around me, to help turn this around.

I identified the Art4Agriculture Young Farming Champions as a group of young people who felt just like me. A core focus of the program is to provide training in how to effectively engage and build relationships with consumers. Through our learning and interactioins we are finding this is an important foundation to success.

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Meat and Livestock Australia Young Farming Champions

I  have just completed my first year of training, which involved learning how to tailor my presentation to an audience in a way that resonates and how to engage with school children. What is particularly exciting about the program is we are also able to engage with their teachers and friends to build a cohort of people who become ambassadors for agriculture and are excited about careers in agriculture.

As part of the program we also get to be the young faces of farming and go into schools participating in the Archibull Prize. This gives students the chance to ask questions about farming practices and careers in the agriculture sector. As part of the Archibull Prize the students create artworks, blogs and multimedia animations, which help take agriculture’s story well beyond the classroom

The program teaches us that the aim is not to educate. The aim is to engage and provide opportunities for consumers to have open, honest and transparent conversations. In this way, we are able to convey we care just as much about the environment and animal well-being as they do.

We are in turn able to show them how challenging it is to farm in a world with declining natural resources, and that if we are going to do this successfully, we need to build strong partnerships between agriculture and the community.

We are also given media training with a strong focus on handling the difficult questions. This has been particularly rewarding for me and shown me it’s not as hard as you might think.

I was recently asked to participate in a live radio interview with the ABC about an upcoming presentation I was to give to the NSW Farmers, Wagga District Council. Having completed a few interviews before with very supportive journalists, I knew I had been lucky and that this would not always be the case.

Prior to the event, I prepared my key messages and because of my Young Farming Champions media training, I was able to stay on message no matter how hard the journalist wanted me to focus on the negatives of agriculture.

In the past, I would have fallen into the trap the journalist set for me. However, I had recently attended a Young Farming Champions workshop where, in the safety of a training environment, I was grilled in the art of staying on message and getting the outcomes I wanted from the interview. This was a very rewarding experience and gave me new confidence

Next year I will have the opportunity to hone my skills by going into schools as part of Art4Agriculture’s programs. Once I have graduated to the next level, I will be given the opportunity to attend master classes, where I will learn how to engage with a diverse range of audiences. Art4Agriculture has recently built a relationship with Rotary and Young Farming Champions who have done master classes will now have an opportunity to present to Rotary groups across Sydney.

YFC 2014

If we want to go further we are given training in how to create a TED talk. We are also provided insights into the art of successful marketing and how important it is to take your audience on the journey with you

But there are plenty more people out there, who are just as passionate as me. People who want to be proactive and build relationships with the community, so we can all work together.

Similarly, they need training, mentoring and ongoing support. Too often I see passionate advocates provided with half day media training and then expected to talk to the media and get it right.

We all feel a huge responsibility when we talk on behalf of our sector and the industry we are part of. It is our responsibility to ensure that the people who take this role on are provided the best training and support, that people who are the faces of the corporate world receive.

We also need to acknowledge not everyone is suitable for this, and we need to support and show how people can value-add to advocacy in many different ways at a level that they are comfortable with.

I am using the skills, knowledge and networks I have developed as an MLA Young Farming Champion to help other youth recognise the social networks and relationships that underpin the new community interest in how our food is produced. This is a great opportunity for us to engage with consumers, and have two-way conversations, that will generate a mutual understanding of each other’s challenges and constraints.

I believe that as farmers, we have so much to share and are so passionate about what we do, however we have not historically been good at communicating this. Our narrative is not to change people’s values, but to demonstrate that farmers share these same values. We have immense pride in what we do; we just need to share these narratives beyond our farm gates to instil trust and confidence in our practices.

Rather than bombard consumers with more science, research or information, I believe it is integral that we demonstrate that we share our consumers’ values on topics that they are most concerned about—safe food, global warming, quality nutrition and animal welfare.

As part of the Young Farming Champion team I now have access to mentors and training, to help develop the skills sets, knowledge and confidence to be part of the solution. These mentors have hands-on, coal face experience, and share this openly and passionately- to help all those involved in the program. This experience is critical to our success- a crucial knowledge bank and practical resources that ensure we don’t repeat the same mistakes that we may have made in the past.

We need to be talking about our farms and our values to become just another role  of the farmer. However it is important to note that this process does not involve educating people, but rather being open and transparent when they want to engage with us.

Just like farmers learn how to use  new farming equipment and technologies, we need to build up our farming community to be confident and have skills  to talk about what they do and why they do it.

My Young Farming Champion story has shown what is possible, it has shown what the backbone of the farming narrative needs to be, and that we can build a confident and skilled group of likeminded people, prepared to talk positively about farming.

It is important agriculture comes together, up skill its people and start telling its story to the world. While everyone has a different story, there are common messages and ways to tell our story that will start people talking positively about farming.

The farming narrative will be told

ht to Greg Mills and Ann Burbrook

Milk Road to China is the big winner in 2014 Archibull Prize

One very tried Archibull Prize events team is sending a big shout out to Katie McRobert Editor of Farmonlne this morning for helping us meet our commitment to share the news from the 2014 Archibull Prize Awards with the world as soon as possible

Katie has done some a great job showcasing the event in the media and I have cheekily ‘appropriated’ ( love that word) her story for The Land found here

Bull, baas take out Art4Ag prizes

14 Nov, 2014 04:55 PM

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Increase Text SizeThe crew from Hurlstone Agricultural College - Jahanui Khatkar, James Blight, Darrelyn Nguyen and Jessica Chau - with their winning entry,

It is an inspiring event to be able to support and promote’ Hon Katrina Hodgkinson . The crew from Hurlstone Agricultural College – Jahanui Khatkar, James Blight, Darrelyn Nguyen and Jessica Chau – with their winning entry, “Ni Cow”.

WINNERS of the 4th annual Archibull Prize were announced in Sydney today at the national awards ceremony for the world famous agriculture themed art and multimedia competition.

School students, teachers and representatives from government, industry and the corporate sector gathered at the Sydney Showgrounds to view the original Archibull artworks.

Students from 40 participating schools from across Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria were invited to decorate life-size, fibreglass cows to showcase the grain, cattle and sheep, wool, cotton or dairy industries. Organiser Lynne Strong called the works “extraordinary and inspired – a feast of colour and creativity”.

Hurlstone Agricultural High School, NSW, was the overall winner with its dairy industry-inspired artwork ‘Ni Cow’. Their entry celebrated the newly-forged connections between the Australian and Chinese dairy industries, and featured a path of powdered milk under the exquisitely painted cow.

Three-year-old Byron Redmond came all the way from Wollongong to see the entries his mum, a teacher, had a hand in creating. Click to see more photos in our online gallery.

NSW Primary Industries Minister Katrina Hodgkinson said the Archibull Prize education initiative has a unique role to play in providing a hands-on learning opportunity for school communities.

“This initiative is a fantastic way to encourage school students, particularly in metropolitan areas, to gain a better understanding of agriculture and where their food and fibre products actually come from,” Ms Hodgkinson said.

“I have been extremely impressed with this year’s entries and congratulate all the winning schools, their students and teachers, for their creativity and commitment to their involvement in this program.

“It is an inspiring event to be able to support and promote.”

Bradley Finn, Tia Duckett, Ashlee Peirson and Kayla Pike from Northlakes High School on the Central Coast. Click to see more photos in our online gallery.

Detail from the winning entry ‘Ni Cow’ from Hurlstone Agricultural College – a tribute to new dairy connections between NSW and China. Click to see more photos in our online gallery.


NATIONAL WINNERS

ARCHIBULL PRIZE GRAND CHAMPION

1st Place: Awarded to Hurlstone Agricultural High School, Glenfield, NSW with 96 points out of 100 across all components (blog and artwork), with its dairy industry-inspired artwork ‘Ni Cow’.

A visually-balanced, unique and complex work of art, Ni Cow is conceptually timely and relevant, symbolising the NSW dairy industry’s recent development of groundbreaking technology to supply fresh milk to China. The sculpture examines the rich culture of China and the valuable partnerships being forged between Australian dairy farmers and the Chinese people.

This year is Hurlstone Agricultural High School’s third year in the competition and their second Grand Champion win. Teacher Jo Ross says after studying the Australian dairy industry and sustainability, the student team explored economic sustainability and the expansion of the dairy export market.

“The students worked in a united team, collaborating to find direction and solve problems … developing autonomy and an authentic ownership of their work. They are now empowered, positive, proud and have an amazing sense of achievement,” Ms Ross says.

“Hurlstone students thoroughly enjoyed the challenge of producing a creative, meaningful and beautiful response to their world.”

Runner up: Kildare Catholic College, Wagga Wagga, NSW, (on 95 points) with its sheep and cattle themed Archibull ‘Kasey’. This boldly coloured cow is a wonderful mesh of community, agriculture, the arts, Wagga Wagga’s renowned sporting heritage and a good old backyard BBQ. On one side Kasey is divided into cuts of meat overlaid with facts celebrating Australian cattle and sheep farmers and sustainability, while the other side showcases their passionate community spirit.

3rd Place: On equal 94 points – Northlakes High School, St Remo, NSW; Matraville Sports High School, Matraville, NSW, and Hamilton North Public School, Broadmeadow, NSW.

Emma Levi, Ziggy Williams, Kit Rodrigueza and Braeden Stewart from Matraville Sports High with their entry “Mattooo”. Click to see more photos in our online gallery.

REGIONAL WINNERS

REGION 1

Champion Archibull Prize Award Winner:

All Souls St Gabriels School – Charters Towers, Qld

Champion Archibull Prize Award Runner Up:

St George State High School – St George, Qld

Winner of Best Blog:

All Souls St Gabriels School – Charters Towers, Qld

Winner of Best Multimedia Animation:

Goondiwindi State High School – Goondiwindi, Qld

Winner of Best Cow Artwork:

Goondiwindi State High School – Goondiwindi, Qld

REGION 2

Champion Archibull Prize Award Winner:

Hurlstone Agricultural High School – Glenfield, NSW

Champion Archibull Prize Award Runner Up:

Three-way tie

Matraville Sports High School – Matraville, NSW

Northlakes High School – St Remo, NSW

Hamilton North Public School – Broadmeadow, NSW

Winner of Best Blog:

Matraville Sports High School – Matraville, NSW

Hamilton North Public School – Broadmeadow, NSW

Winner of Best Multimedia Animation:

Hamilton North Public School – Broadmeadow, NSW

Winner of Best Cow Artwork:

Hurlstone Agricultural High School – Glenfield, NSW

REGION 3

Champion Archibull Prize Award Winner:

Kildare Catholic College – Wagga Wagga, NSW

Champion Archibull Prize Award Runner Up:

Kilbreda College Mentone, Vic

Winner of Best Blog:

Kilbreda College Mentone, Vic

Winner of Best Multimedia Animation:

Kildare Catholic College – Wagga Wagga, NSW

Winner of Best Cow Artwork:

Kildare Catholic College – Wagga Wagga, NSW

ARCHIBULL PRIZE PRIMARY SCHOOL

Reserve Champion Archibull Primary School:

Tie – Bolwarra Public School, Bolwarra, NSW, and Gwynneville Public School, Gwynneville, NSW

Champion Archibull Primary School:

Hamilton North Public School, Broadmeadow, NSW

ARCHIBULL PRIZE POULTRY PIONEER AWARD

Wiripaang Public School, Gateshead, NSW

NATIONAL TREASURES AWARD

Emerson School, Dandenong North, Vic

Pick the Winner of the 2014 Archibull Prize

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It is with great excitement that we announce the finalists in the 2014 Archibull Prize.

The judges decision is in and now it’s your turn to decide the People’s Choice.

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Click on the photo to see a larger version and vote for your favourite Archie.

We know these photos don’t do the entries justice so if you would like to see more elements and both sides of all these masterpieces you will find them in our Facebook photo albums here .

The winner of the People’s Choice Archibull Prize 2014 is Hurlstone Agricultural High School Glenfield NSW

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Archibull Prize judging travels east to west

Week 2 Day 5 of judging saw 2014 Archibull Prize judge Wendy Taylor travel from the eastern suburbs of Sydney to Mt Anan in the West

First up was Little Bay Community of Schools entry Bloo Moo ‘Grass to Glass’ – ‘Have three serves of dairy and fly through your day’.

Bloo Moo is the result of a peer teaching and learning partnership across the five
Little Bay Community of Schools. Year 8 students from Matraville Sports High acted
as mentors, peer teaching the Primary students dairy content and art making techniques.

This is what Wendy had to say about Bloo Moo

Little Bay Community of Schools

“Blue Moo” is definitely a cow that could jump over the the moon.

Her wings are fabulous! Made from recycled plastic milk bottles, they soar from her sides and are a real statement feature. Her sponged blue skin highlights her painted patches, which tell the story of milk from ‘grass to glass’ as well as portraying her as a crazy, ‘extraordinary dairy’ cow.

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Next up was mentor school Matraville Sports High School Wendy said “Mattooo” is a study of contrasts.

She tells a subtle story of dairy from ‘farm to fridge’ through layers of contrast and pared back simplicity. Her hard black side is overlaid with delicate topographic mapping of NSW dairy farming areas, while her white side is a mass-produced fridge. Inside, is an exquisite stylised digestive diagram based on indigenous motifs and a high tech projection which tells the inside story of the dairy industry. She showcases complexity and simplicity.

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Next Wendy headed south west to Narellan to visit Elizabeth MacArthur High School

This is what Wendy had to say about their Archie they have named Susan

This “Susan” is not a lazy Susan or a Black-eyed Susan.

She is busy and vibrant. Her bold colours catch the viewer immediately and her tactile and interactive features invite you to touch. The growing grasses along her back and at her feet are a highlight and help to tell Susan’s story of the grain industry. Her beautifully painted head is a stand out.

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Archibull Prize judging goes south of the border to ‘Mexico’

Week 2 Day 3 of  Archibull Prize 2014 judging saw Wendy fly from Newcastle to Melbourne where she visited Kilbreda College and the Emerson Special School

This is what Wendy had to say about the schools she visited in Melbourne

First up was Kilbreda College

“Hidey” has nothing to hide! She has a very simple and subtle story – showing a pictorial of different grains an1d their textures. It is her vibrant bands of eye-popping colour overlaid with the intricate patterns of the grains which give her visual appeal. The balance of colour, pattern and texture is very well done. Her living grain base is a nice contrast and adds to the sense of balance.

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Follow Kilbreda College Archibull journey via their blog here  and their video

From Kilbreda College Wendy travelled to Emerson School.

Each year with the support of a different organisation Art4Agriculture is able to support a school who isn’t able to undertake the full program but are passionate about sharing the great stories of farmers and farming with their students. This year Emerson Special School was chosen to be that school and wow what a special group of people they are ( students and teachers)

Emerson School is a specialist school located in Dandenong, Victoria, catering to students with mild intellectual processing difficulties. From an initial enrolment of less than 100 students in 1973, Emerson has grown to be one of the leading providers of specialist education in Victoria, with 100 staff now supporting 400 students to achieve their potential.

A proud and vibrant member of the local community, Emerson prides itself on being a school of first choice – not a school of last resort.

The Emerson community exists to provide a first rate education to all who walk through its doors. Emerson School is comprised of our Junior School (students aged 5-11 years), Middle School (12-15 years) and Senior School (16-18 years). Class sizes range from 8 students per class in the Junior School to 16-19 in the Middle and Senior Schools. These small classes ensure that programs are able to be tailored to individual students’ requirements. Source

This is what Wendy had to say about Emerson Public School

“Daisy” is very well named. She is cosy and comfortable and warm. Her knitted coat has loads of texture and appeal, with the felted daisies being the standout feature. Her stylish hat and gorgeous eyelashes complete the picture. Her story of wool is simple and thorough and perfectly encapsulates the breadth of the learning done by the students.

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Watch the wonderful video they have made of their  journey with Daisy to learn about wool

The Archibull Prize judging see Moos in the Museum

Week two Day two of the 2014 Archibull Prize judging found Wendy at the magnificent Newcastle Museum

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Newcastle district primary schools and Maitland Grossman High School put on a wonderful display of Archie’s at the museum for both Wendy and the public

This is what Wendy had to say

Hamilton North Public School’s “Mr Archiwool” is so warm and well wrapped up!

He is clever, vibrant and tactile. His subtle story of the Wool industry is well thought out and well expressed and his links to Bessie (their Young Farming Champion) are beautiful. His sense of fun and playfulness are undeniable. He perfectly captures the fact that simplicity can be a very effective tool.

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Is “Mabel”  from Maitland Grossmann High School a pull-along toy? Or is she a pair of jeans?

Her subtle worn-looking base coat is the star. It ties all her elements together into a homogeneous design, while adding a layer of depth. The pull along toy concept is clever and quirky, while the denim look (especially around the neck) is effective and creates a fine layer of detail. She tells a quiet and subtle story of cotton in a very expressive way.

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Threadrick McBobbin from Bolwarra Public School is a character.

From his highly original name to his stylish hat, skintight jeans and buttoned-up shirt, this little cow is big on personality. His seasonal pictorial of the cotton industry is simple, beautiful and informative, while his furrowed base and little trolley of products complete the story. He is charming and vibrant and very expressive.

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“WiriChick”  from Wiripaang Public School is in a class of its own!

She is unique in just about every aspect – she is alone in representing the egg and poultry industries this year; she has used projections (which is a first for the Archibull Prize); and the sheer number of different techniques explored on her surface make her stand out. The colourful mosaic surface is wonderful, as is her crushed eggshell face and feathered legs.

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Archibull Prize judging takes us to China

Day 1 of Week 2 of the 2014 Archibull Prize judging saw artwork judge Wendy Taylor head west towards the Blue Mountains

First off the rank was Hurlstone Agricultural High School

This is what Wendy had to say about their Archie who they have called Ni Cow

“Ni Cow isn’t a bull in a china shop. She is a cow from China.

Everything about her has layers of meaning and complexity and has been well thought out. She is well balanced visually, and takes an interesting viewpoint with both her sustainability message -that of financial sustainability -as well as her viewpoint of the dairy industry. She is relevant and intrinsically unique. Her delicate patterning and limited colour palette perfectly reflect the concept. No detail has been missed and every component adds to the total picture.

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Next up was Hawkesbury High School

Wendy said “Baa-Baa Rella” has the best horns!

They are red and white striped and link perfectly with her name and elements of the wool industry (Barber’s Pole Worms). She shows us two very different views of the wool industry in Australia. One side is vibrant, lush and reminiscent of the paintings of Tom Roberts, while the other side is a graphic and complex collage. The simple map on her side is a great element which complements her story well.

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Then Wendy headed back to Caringbah where she visited James Ruse Agricultural High School

Would you like to see inside the Dairy industry? Or inside “Archie”?

The hero element of Archie is the story itself. All elements of the industry are covered in her concept, with the process line from paddock to product being the ‘inside’ story. The working milk pump is a star, as is her interactivity. Her vibrant colours stand out and she is fun and playful. She has features all over to make the viewer smile.

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