Archibull Prize judging travels east to west

Week 2 Day 5 of judging saw 2014 Archibull Prize judge Wendy Taylor travel from the eastern suburbs of Sydney to Mt Anan in the West

First up was Little Bay Community of Schools entry Bloo Moo ‘Grass to Glass’ – ‘Have three serves of dairy and fly through your day’.

Bloo Moo is the result of a peer teaching and learning partnership across the five
Little Bay Community of Schools. Year 8 students from Matraville Sports High acted
as mentors, peer teaching the Primary students dairy content and art making techniques.

This is what Wendy had to say about Bloo Moo

Little Bay Community of Schools

“Blue Moo” is definitely a cow that could jump over the the moon.

Her wings are fabulous! Made from recycled plastic milk bottles, they soar from her sides and are a real statement feature. Her sponged blue skin highlights her painted patches, which tell the story of milk from ‘grass to glass’ as well as portraying her as a crazy, ‘extraordinary dairy’ cow.

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Next up was mentor school Matraville Sports High School Wendy said “Mattooo” is a study of contrasts.

She tells a subtle story of dairy from ‘farm to fridge’ through layers of contrast and pared back simplicity. Her hard black side is overlaid with delicate topographic mapping of NSW dairy farming areas, while her white side is a mass-produced fridge. Inside, is an exquisite stylised digestive diagram based on indigenous motifs and a high tech projection which tells the inside story of the dairy industry. She showcases complexity and simplicity.

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Next Wendy headed south west to Narellan to visit Elizabeth MacArthur High School

This is what Wendy had to say about their Archie they have named Susan

This “Susan” is not a lazy Susan or a Black-eyed Susan.

She is busy and vibrant. Her bold colours catch the viewer immediately and her tactile and interactive features invite you to touch. The growing grasses along her back and at her feet are a highlight and help to tell Susan’s story of the grain industry. Her beautifully painted head is a stand out.

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Archibull Prize Judging Tour goes to the Atherton Tablelands

The Archibull Prize judging tour Week 1 Day 2 saw our well-travelled judge Wendy Taylor fly from Sydney to Cairns and drive to the Tablelands Regional Gallery to see the masterpieces created by the four schools participating in far north Queensland

This is what Wendy had to say about the bovine artworks produced by the four schools in the region

Atherton State High School

“Cornealus”, not surprisingly, is all about Corn.

A grain industry story is told, while nestling beneath the recognisable skyline of the Atherton Tablelands. The striking contrast of the black and white Holstein base being overtaken by twining corn stalks grabs attention. Their love of their local community is obvious, as is their connection to the maize industry.

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You can hear the song they wrote for the competition here

You can read their blog here

Mareeba State High School

“Savannah” definitely hails from the remote gulf areas of Australia. Her flat desert browns are beautifully balanced by the soft hints of colour on her landscape. She depicts the beef industry from dawn to dusk, showcasing the people involved in it, as well as the animals. The fascinating techniques used create a subtle and beautiful effect, which perfectly complements the colour palette.

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You can read their blog here

Malanda State High School

This beef “Patty” has definitely gone green.

Sustainability in the beef industry is the theme for Patty and it shows. She has pasture grasses growing out of her back, and trees growing from her horns. She is textural and informative. Not many beef Patties make you want to touch them, but this beef Patty definitely does.

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See the students Archibull journey here

Ravenshoe State School

This is one “A-maizing” Cow.

The ‘yellow brick road’ made from corn, is the hero. The time and care taken for this one element are astonishing. It weaves around her, taking the viewer on a journey through the Grains industry from the paddock to the pub (and the bake’rye’ and ‘corn’er shop). In this case, all roads don’t lead to Rome; they either lead to or from the silo.

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Archibull Prize Art Judge Tour Takes Off

The quest for the winning Archie has begun in schools across Australia’s eastern states, with the 2014 Archibull Prize judging tour hitting the road this week.

Archibull art judge Wendy Taylor will travel more than 6000km during the next four weeks, visiting 40 participating schools across Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

Thousands of primary and secondary students have spent the past two terms creating extraordinary and inspired original artworks on life-size, fiberglass cows through the Archibull Prize competition.

Wendy has been part of the Archibull Prize judging team since its inception and says the level of effort, collaboration and excitement from this year’s students is phenomenal and the Archies are some of the best yet.

“It is going to be a very tough job deciding who will take out the title of Grand Champion,” Wendy says. “Not only are the Archie artworks remarkable, but the ideas and inspiration behind them blow me away.”

Wendy Taylor is an architect and designer who, alongside her architect husband Craig, established red blue architecture + design. The couple has designed the Central District Exhibit at the Sydney Royal Easter Show for 23 years – taking out multiple awards during this time.

Week 1 saw Wendy visiting Queensland and visit Queensland she did

Day 1 looked like this Sydney to Moree to Goondiwindi to Moree to Sydney but boy was it worth it.

Queensland

This is what Wendy had to say about the three bovine materpieces she saw on the 1st day of judging

First up was Goondiwindi State High School

“St Francesca” (the Holey Cow) has her head in the clouds and cotton on the brain.

She is clever and sophisticated, and encapsulates the essence of the cotton industry beautifully. Her ‘irrigation wings’ add an extra layer of intricacy and complexity, as well as a wonderful sculptural quality. Her concept -which appears deceptively simple at first glance- is the star. There is layer after layer of meaning, which forms a cohesive whole.

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Check out this great little video which shares the students and their Holey Cow’s journey

Next up was Goondiwindi State School

“Archy Boll” tells both the story of the cotton process from growing to gin as well as the story from plant to product. Both sides are vibrant and tactile and are instantly appealing. Her dazzling yellow side is the stand-out for me with its delicate pictograms and tactile jeans!

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And then St George State High School pulled out all stops to deliver their magnificent Archie in style

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“IPM” makes your skin feel like it is crawling with bugs!

She gives the viewer a wonderful pictorial story of the school’s local area, while telling the story of sustainability in the cotton industry. The Balonne River wraps around her, giving the viewer a guided tour of the community. All over her, ladybugs weave their magic, leaving trails of fact about the cotton industry. She is intricate, clever, vibrant and fun.

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Follow the students journey on their blog here

Wow what a great start You can see why Wendy is so excited

Champions in the Paddock and Champions on the Cutting Floor

Its been a very exciting week for our 2014 Grains Young Farming Champions  Rebecca Thistlethwaite, Daniel Fox, Diana George and Jessica Kirkpatrick with their “An Innovative Industry” video taking out the Royal Adelaide Show ‘Seed to Store Competition’ and  prize money of $1000.

The  Grains YFC  team plan to use their prize money to engage a professional animator to help create a video animation to showcase the industry they love 

YFChampions-7750

L-R Dee George, Jessica Kirkpatrick, Rebecca Thistlethwaite and Daniel Fox

Channel Nine’s Andrew ‘Cosi’ Costello, along with the Grains Research and Development Corporation’s (GRDC) Kathleen Allan and South Australian Grains Industry Trust’s (SAGIT) David Shannon showcased the top five entries, and awarded the prestigious blue ribbon, on the Coke Stage.

“This is the first year the Royal Adelaide Show has run the Seed to Store contest as a competitive entry and we are thrilled at how the initiative has increased awareness of the role of food production in Australia,” Ms Allan said.

“The YouTube clip competition is a new competitive entry which involves developing a one-minute video clip promoting the grains sector. It is an exciting initiative which allows agriculture to be promoted through social media, which is fundamental in reaching the young generation of consumers.”

The competition, managed by AgCommunicators and supported by the GRDC and SAGIT, which worked collaboratively with the Royal Agricultural & Horticultural Society to coincide the launch of the clips with the show’s 175th birthday.

SAGIT Trustee David Shannon believes it is important to remind people where their food comes from, and was excited that the YouTube clip gave entrants the opportunity to showcase modern, innovative and sustainable farming.

“The link between where food begins and the end product can be lost because of little knowledge of grains and how they fit into our food production systems,” he said.

“With 16,800 grains of wheat in a loaf of bread and around 1600 grains of barley in a can of beer the YouTube clips will help to reconnect people with the source of grains in their food.”

“The standard of the competition was extremely high, with entrants using great editing and communication skills to show the process of food production in Australia,” Mr Shannon said.

Top five entries  video can be accessed at these links

FIRST PRIZE: Art4Agriculture Grains Young Farming Champions – Rebecca Thistlethwaite, Daniel Fox, Diana George and Jessica Kirkpatrick.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrmVPbNJsVU

SECOND PRIZE: ‘What does the plant say’ – Bethany Simpson, Meg Jarvis, Chelsea Arthur, Ayeisha Bishop, Eliza Bastian and Pieter Cillie, Booleroo Centre
http://youtu.be/MTParxcjyMA

THIRD PRIZE: ‘Seed to Store’, Marni Greenshields, University of South Australia
http://youtu.be/aAYM1FcPwis

FOURTH PRIZE: Adele Justice and Ann Rowett, Xavier College
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkT6SnfC8Fk&feature=youtu.be

FIFTH PRIZE: Urrbrae Agricultural High School Team 5 – Kelsey Adams, Clare Edgecombe, Cody Faucett, Fletcher Wood and staff Nick Jackson and Tracey Ireland
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1uqj139jwU&index

Well done team YFC Grains

So many myths about food driven by emotion and not backed by science.

Everyday I am reminded through conversations I have with people in the community just how confused people are about food production systems and I can see why.

what it takes to be a farmer

They are continually bombarded with messages that tell them its wrong to eat animals.  Yet nobody talks about what the world would look like if we didn’t eat animals. Lets not be too naive here it is a conversation that we must have. Realistically if animals were free to roam and populate the world animals and humans will be competing for food  in a very short time.

Lets discuss some of the realities

  • We already have thousands of domestic dogs and cats who end up in animal shelters for various reasons. What happens to the majority of them?. Yes they are euthanized,
  • Less than 6% of Australia is suitable for growing crops. Can we seriously all become vegetarians and share the food we produce with all the animals that will rapidly populate this country if we let them all run free.
  • Australia is the driest continent on the earth. There are years and years where farmers struggle to access fodder to feed their sheep and cattle and the only the answer to that is the abattoirs.
  • A lot of these animals are carnivores. Who is going to reason with pigs and tell them they cant eat people.
  • We just cant feed people everyone from vegie gardens in back yards. Seriously how many people living in urban areas have the time or the desire to go back to their farming roots and hold down 9 to 5 jobs. This is put into perspective nicely here. Can Urban Agriculture Feed the World

Then there is this proliferation of boutique farmers who tell us their style of farming is the only one that is sustainable and big agriculture is bad for the planet . Well is that a myth?  Visit here to get an alternate view that is backed by real science.

Then there is the myth that organic farming is best farming method for the planet. Again this is driven by emotion and media and PR campaigns that promotes organic farming by deriding main stream family farmers and not backed by science. The ABC Checkout program covers this brilliantly here

Never before has it been more important for mainstream agriculture to connect and have conversations with consumers. Never before has it been so important that we give consumers the opportunity to get a balanced viewpoint so they can make food choices that are based on their values backed by real science. This is the ethos behind  Art4Agriculture and the Young Farming Champions program and out next post will share with you the positive impacts our programs are having in schools

Can your big idea win you $100,000 to help tackle the wicked problems

One of the things I love about the Young Farming Champions program is it attracts young people with a strong social conscience. Young people who want to work together to leave a lasting legacy for agriculture and their communities and communities everywhere. 

They go into schools as part of the Archibull Prize, a program that is tailored to give every child and adult it reaches the tools to make a difference today and tomorrow

We agree with the words of Richard Branson

It is our responsibility to inspire and empower future leaders with the knowledge and passion needed to tackle the most critical issues facing the world. By encouraging them to be problem solvers and innovators, we are helping to protect and promote their futures

Each year we invite the schools and student participating to write a blog entitled ‘Sustainable Living – What you can do to change the way you live’. This year the students may just come up with a big idea that they could submit to the Zayed Energy Prize that offers the winner $100,000 to bring their idea to fruition .

The Global High Schools category aims to inspire future generations across the globe, by instilling an ethos of sustainability from an early age.

Schools are asked to submit a detailed proposal for a project that encourages measurable initiatives that promote renewable energy and sustainability in schools.

Grant money will be awarded to one school in each of the five dedicated regions: The Americas, Europe, Africa, Oceania, and Asia. The prizes are very generous. Each regional winner will be allocated up to $100,000 to turn their project into a reality.

ZayedfutureenergyprizeFinal-Outlined

The Zayed Energy Prize rewarding innovators

This year we have partnered with Ian McConnel from World Wildlife Fund to help support the students efforts.

I will shortly be joining Ian and 50 other Australians including James Walker at a retreat that aims  

To bring together community leaders from across Australia who care about the future and who are ready to take the next step on climate action. 

What will we be doing?:

We’ll be fostering new networks and relationships, discussing solutions and learning practical skills in community organising, campaigning, communications and networking.

 

Announcing the successful schools participating 2014 Archibull Prize

Its gives us great pleasure to announce the successful schools who will be participating in the 2014 Archibull Prize. 

Archibull Prize 2014 Schools 

As you can see we have schools right down the eastern seaboard from the Atherton Tablelands to Melbourne. Last year we travelled 4500km to judge the artworks OMG its going to be big gig this year.

We see 2014 as the year to take the Archibull Prize into rural and regional Australia and bring some joy to areas affected by the harsh climatic conditions our farmers have experienced over the last few years.

Our young farming champions and the Art4Agriculture team look forward to working with farmers, state farming organisations, Landcare and natural resource management agencies and local communities to make this the best year ever   

We have divided the schools into three regions

Schools in Region 1

Region 1

Schools in Region 2

Region 2 Schools

 

Schools in Region 3

Region 3

If you live in any of these regions and want to get involved please feel free to contact the Art4Agriculture team

Email Lynnestrong@art4agriculture.com.au