Young Farming Champions Muster June 2018 Week 3

This weeks top stories from our Young Farming Champions across the country

In the Field 

Wool Young Farming Champion Katherine Bain currently getting the Cow Girl Experience in Canada will take up her new role as a Production Analyst with Paraway Pastoral in their head office in Orange in August.

Katherine B.JPG

Beef Young Farming Champion Tim Eyes is hosting his Archibull Prize School The Lakes College at his farm on 21st June 2018. Wow are they in for a treat

Tim Eyes  (6).jpg

Out of the Field.

Wool Young Farming Champions Peta Bradley and Caitlin Heppner caught up with Young Farmer Business Program  Team of Alex MacDonald and newly appointed Adele Henry whilst visiting Orange last week for The Archibull Prize.  Its was widely agreed that the Young Farmer Champions will be invaluable in promoting the opportunities available as part of the YFBP.  Megs Dunford from the DPI Schools Program also attended and gave an overview of how they support primary and secondary schools.

Aussie Farmers Foundation supported Young Farming Champion Jasmine Whitten stars in the latest Art4Agriculture video showing young people how they can become Eggsperts

Shoutout to #YouthVoices18 Dione Howard and Emma Turner who will be participating in Hour of Power at MerinoLink Conference in Goulburn. Awesome opportunity for young professionals to speak about their work and passions within the wool industry.  Read more here

#WearWool #LoveWool #WOOLisCOOL #YouthinAg

Wool Young Farming Champion Dione Howard will be visiting Moss Vale High School participating in The Archibull Prize 2018 to share her story and inspire next wool ambassadors

Young Farming Champions Jasmine Whitten, Lucy Collingridge and Meg Rice fly out to Argentina today for IFAMA conference. Find out more here and you can follow their journey on Facebook.

Lucy Collingridge Depart
Lucy Collingridge
Jasmine Depart
Jasmine Whitten

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Following in the footsteps of Young Farming Champion Bronwyn Roberts in 2013 Youth Voices Leadership Team member Anika Molesworth is the key note speaker tonight at the Marcus Oldham Leadership Course Dinner. Anika will be sharing her leadership journey through the 7 Forks in the Road that have led her to where she is today.

  1. Finding your fight
  2. Believing in yourself
  3. Backing yourself
  4. Finding your wolf pack
  5. Jump in to learn how to swim
  6. Never stop learning
  7. Having the courage of your convictions

Huge congratulations to Young Farming Champions Liz Lobsey and Emma Ayliffe who have recently been announced as finalists in the Adama Young Agronomist of the Year

Emma and Liz.JPG

till next time share your stories with us using the hashtags #YouthVoices #Youthinag

_2017 Supporting partners Capture

 

 

 

 

Art4Agriculture at the MerinoLink Conference

The 2018 MerinoLink Conference  and Field Day will be held in Goulburn this week on 20th and 21st June and Art4Agriculture will be flying the flag for young people in agriculture.

The purpose of the MerinoLink Annual Conference is to provide an opportunity for sheep producers and service providers to network, learn about research outcomes and management programs and also to have a positive influence on the future direction of the sheep industry in Australia. 

A highlight of the conference will be the Hour of Power, sponsored by T.A.Field Estates, which will give an opportunity to nine young professionals to speak about their work and passions within the wool industry. During this session Art4Agriculture will be represented by Young Farming Champions Dione Howard and Emma Turner.

Dione will elaborate on concepts she delivered last year at the Australian Farm Institute’s Roundtable Conference where she encouraged industry to invest in and support young professionals. See her inspirational speech here.

Dione AFI RoundTable (2)

Dione, who will be appealing to both new and experienced members at MerinoLink, says these are her take-home messages:

There are many opportunities that exist for young people to get involved in the wool industry.

Programs such as Art4Agriculture’s Young Farming Champions exist so that our industry can invest in us as young people in wool. 

I urge members of our industry to get behind young people with an interest in wool and support them to step up and take on available opportunities.

 Emma, who is set to graduate from the University of New England in October, will use her time at the Hour of Power to present her honours project to industry.

Emma Turner (39)

My honours project, on the implementation of shorter shearing intervals at Ivanhoe comparing six and twelve month shearings, is highly relevant to the industry and I am hoping the Hour of Power will give my research exposure and provide networking opportunities as I job hunt for the future.

 Rounding out Art4Agriculture’s involvement in MerinoLink will be National Program Director Lynne Strong who will be the speaker at the conference dinner. Lynne will use her life journey from a pharmacist to a farmer to illustrate how the wool industry will benefit from the investment in youth and how working together makes innovation fast and easy.

_2017 Landcare Conference Lynne Strong 16_9 _Page_01

It is wonderful to see the 2018 MerinoLimk Conference following our vision to help young people stand up and be confident to share their own stories

#LoveWool #WearWool #WOOLisCOOL #YouthVoices18 #YouthinAg

_2017 Supporting partners Capture

 

Sheep Producers Australia is seeking applications from people in the sheep industry aged 25 to 40 for the 2018 Sheep Industry Ambassadors Award.

 

The Sheep Industry Ambassadors Award is an initiative of the Building leadership capability for the sheep industry project offered by Sheep Producers Australia and Meat and Livestock Australia.

It acknowledges the contributions of two outstanding young sheep producers as well as their future potential as industry leaders.

The award includes an all-expenses paid, week-long study tour from 1-5 August 2018. It features visits showcasing the industry supply chain across Victoria and South Australia with leaders of the United States sheep industry.

Ambassadors will then travel to Perth to attend the SPA Leadersheep Forum and Australia’s premier sheep industry conference LambEx 2018, from 5-7 August 2018.

A range of other opportunities and professional development are also included as part of the award, totalling $4500 value.

Do you know someone working in the sheep industry who could be a future leader and would benefit from networking with Australian and international industry leaders?

Sheep Producers Australia is seeking applications from people in the sheep industry aged 25 to 40 for the 2018 Sheep Industry Ambassadors Award.

The award recognises the contributions of two outstanding sheep industry people and their potential as industry leaders as part of the SPA and Meat & Livestock Australia joint initiative, ‘Building Leadership Capability for the Sheep Industry’.

The initiative’s objective is to ensure the Australian sheep industry attracts and retains people with leadership skills to contribute to the long-term viability of the industry by developing industry capability and capacity.

The Ambassador Award includes an all-expenses paid, week-long study tour from 1-8 August 2018 including attending Australia’s premier sheepmeat industry event, LambEx 2018 and the SPA Leadersheep Forum in Perth. It features visits showcasing the industry supply chain across Victoria and South Australia with leaders of the United States sheep industry.

There is also the potential to be part of other professional development and industry representation opportunities with SPA. The award is valued at more than $4500, a significant investment in developing each future leader.

Interested future leaders must submit an application form and a two-minute video clip to be considered for the award. In the video, applicants must demonstrate their role in the industry and their vision for its future.

Applicants must be able to demonstrate their industry involvement including work and education history, their capacity to be a current sheep industry ambassador, their understanding of the industry’s importance and articulate a vision for its future. They must also have the potential to be a future leader within the industry and SPA and be willing to work with SPA on industry initiatives.

Ben Munzberg, Victoria, was one of the 2016 ambassador award winners. He says the award provided him with a deeper understanding of the entire sheep industry and how all segments of the industry work together.

“I feel I am now better equipped to have input to producer groups and take on leadership roles, both at the workplace and within the industry,” he said. “Since starting the program, it has driven and encouraged me to join and be more active in producer groups, which has improved my networking and provided a great place to learn from other people.

“I would certainly recommend the Ambassador Award to others. It has been a fantastic experience which has allowed me to meet some great people involved in the sheep industry, build international networks, gain a better understand of all aspects of the industry and develop as a person.”

Applications close at 9am on Monday 25 June 2018. The application form and video guidelines are available at www.sheepproducers.com.au/ambassadors

 

Young Farming Champions Muster June 2018 Week 1

This weeks top stories from Young Farming Champions across the country

In the Field 

Our Young Farming Champions like Wool producer and UNE Honours student Emma Turner are regularly invited to share their research at events like MerinoLink The Hour of Power .  You can never overestimate the value of a great head shot for your bio and we love working with Antony Hands at Chasing Summer Photography who shot Emma’s portfolio this week.  We are confident you will agree we also got the perfect shot for our In the Field segment this week.

Speaking of UNE students big shout out for your first trimester exams this week

From the Field

Young Farming Champions Tayla Field and  Emma Ayliffe will be visiting schools in Sydney and Wollongong as part The Archibull Prize 2018.

Another 1000 students will be talking  all things cotton and veggies, gaining a greater understanding of the challenges to feed and clothe them in the 21st Century and being  inspired to join the next generation of agriculturalists finding solutions to those challenges.

Lucy Collingridge is travelling to Edmonton and Argentina later in the year and has created the Facebook page 1 Agriculturalist 2 Conferences 3 Countries  to share her learnings from her trips.  Lucy is looking forward to bringing home some fresh ideas for both the Australian agricultural sector and the show movement.

Wool Young Farming Champion Sam Wan has organised a special treat for her visit to Picnic Point High School

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Prime Cuts 

UNE students Jasmine Whitten, Lucy Collingridge and Meg Rice have been selected to participate in an agribusiness study tour of Argentina and Uruguay which includes attending the 2018 International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA) Annual World Symposium and Forum in Buenos Aires. Lucy and  Jasmine will represent UNE in the (IFAMA) Student Case Competition. UNE won the undergraduate division of the global competition in 2017.

The Study Tour is run as 6 credit point unit and is aligned with the annual IFAMA conference which is held in a different global location each year.

Young Farming Champion Casey Onus shares her tour highlights from 2017 here

_2017 Supporting partners Capture

Young Farming Champion Sam Coggins is paying it forward on an international scale

In 2017 Young Farming Champion Sam Coggins graduated from university in one of the most prosperous cities in the world, yet his focus is on the millions of farmers in developing countries. He has a passion to help them strengthen their scientific and technological capacity and move towards sustainable patterns of consumption and production.

“In 2014, approximately 805 million people in the world did not have enough food

 to lead a healthy, active life. That’s about one in nine people on Earth.

The vast majority of these people live in developing countries. Poor nutrition

is the underlying cause in nearly half (45%) of all deaths of children under

five years old – 3.1 million children each year. While all people have a

right to safe and nutritious food, this human right is denied to many.

Like other important resources, food is not equally distributed across the world.”

Source World Vision

With a degree in soil science from The University of Sydney Sam now works with The Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), an organisation that commissions research for the benefit of farmers in developing countries and Australia.

I’m chipping in as graduate in ACIAR’s soils program. I get to work on meaningful

projects alongside highly capable and down-to-earth people.

I’m genuinely loving it.

Sam credits his parents for financially supporting him through university, which allowed him the time and freedom to follow his altruistic dreams for a better world. While at university he:

  • Mentored and tutored indigenous high school students through the AIME program.
  • Created the Food Wastage Fighters Society with the aims to reduce wastage and boost community awareness. The society won the ‘Best New Club’ award and has over 150 members.
  • Studied for a semester in Sri Lanka and interned at the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines through the New Colombo Plan Scholarship and spoke on behalf of the 100 2016 New Colombo Plan scholars at the awards ceremony.
  • Participated in the Bayer Youth Ag Summit in Belgium as well as the Chicago Council Food Security Symposium in Washington DC.
  • Went through the University of Sydney Genesis startup incubator, which generated projects such as ChemCrush (which won Best Social Innovation) and RiseHarvest.

Sam’s many achievements at university (including participation in AFL, soccer and athletics) culminated in the awarding of the prestigious University of Sydney Convocation Medal in 2018:

“This medal is awarded to one person who, in the previous year, graduated or

completed the requirements for a bachelor’s degree, and who has achieved a

high standard of academic proficiency, contributed to the diverse life of the

University, and may also have contributed to the broader community.”

On winning the Convocation Medal Sam was more rewarded by the joy in his parents’ faces, for personal recognition is not as important to Sam as the work he is doing. His time in Sri Lanka, in particular, was a life-changing event for him and taught him great lessons that will guide his career well into the future:

“I tasted the unfairness of the world during my semester in Sri Lanka. I learned

that achievements in my life will always originate from opportunities I was

lucky to get. This lesson beat the arrogance out of me and made me

commit to a career contributing to a fairer world.”

That career is on a stellar trajectory. Sam, with two friends, is further developing RiseHarvest, a smartphone app designed to help Burmese farmers use nitrogen fertiliser more effectively. This project was selected from 800 teams from 160 countries in the Thought for Food Challenge and will allow Sam and his friends to pitch the idea at the TFF Summit, which takes place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in July 2018.

Though the accolades may flow, Sam Coggins will remain committed to his ideals of contributing to that fairer world through agricultural innovation.

_2017 Supporting partners Capture

Young Farming Champions Muster – Week 4 May 2018

Our vision is to promote positive images and perceptions of farming and engage in activities and innovative programs that encourage Australia’s best and brightest to consider a career in agriculture

Our Young Farming Champions are regularly in the field and out and about sharing agriculture’s good news stories.

Our Young Farming Champions also grab every opportunity to learn and grow and pay it forward

This weeks top stories from Young Farming Champions across the country

From the Field:

This week Cowra Grain farmer  Marlee Langfield  is speaking to Paterson Rotary on women in agriculture, alternative career pathways and opportunities for youth in the rural communities.  Marlee is also visiting Vacy Public school as guest speaker talking all things grains with students currently undertaking a science and technology paddock to plate unit

In the Field

Dr Jo Newton is presenting at the AgriBio Site seminar on ImProving Herds

Anika Molesworth is participating in the  Rice Industry Leadership Program 2018 –2020 – the “Foundations of Leadership Course. This eight day program has been developed in conjunction with the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation.

Prime Cuts

People are agriculture’s most important resource. Young people in agriculture have access to a plethora of opportunities to grow as people, and to develop innovative ideas which will continue driving agriculture forward to a bright future

This week we are excited to announce

Sharna Holman has been selected to participate in the Future Cotton Leaders program . Previous YFC participants have been wax lyrical about this program and we look forward to Sharna sharing her  Future Cotton Leaders journey with us and the wider community

Lucy Collingridge and Stephanie Fowler have been successful in receiving a scholarship to attend the Royals of the Commonwealth Conference in Edmonton. This is another experience that has allowed previous YFC scholarship  winners like dynamo Hannah Barber  to contribute at the highest level to the agricultural show movement.

Sam Coggins  has won both the University of Sydney Medal for High Distinction subject average and the prestigious Convocation Medal which honours alumni who have shaped our world

#Youthinag #YouthVoices18

_2017 Supporting partners Capture

 

 

23 year old CEO Marlee Langfield says you have to be fearless

“It can be lonely spending endless hours on the tractor during sowing or on the header at harvest; I just sing along with the radio for company. You have to be fearless, too. You can’t be afraid of much or it’ll hold you back.” Marlee Langfield  

Young Farming Champion Marlee Langfield at just 23 years of age is CEO and manager of her family farm ‘Wallaringa’ in Cowra.  in 2016 women represented 28.1 per cent of Farmers and Farm Managers (39 776 people) in the census but only 2.8% of women are in CEO positions.

WomenInAg_Graphs

Marlee had 10 years to prepare ( see backstory below) herself to take on the CEO position and with the support of her family and network of wise advisers she has made the most of every minute.  Marlee pours as much energy into her ‘in-field’ activities as her “from the field’ activities.

This week she shares her love of agriculture, its diverse career opportunities  for youth in rural Australia with Paterson Rotary.  She will also be guest speaker at Vacy Public school for students undertaking a science and technology unit paddock to plate.

Marlee is a great example of young people in rural and regional Australia paying it forward and inspiring others to do the same

Below is the backstory reprinted from a Farmonline interview in 2012 when Marlee was just 15 years old.

WHEN Marlee Langfield’s father Thomas died in 2008, he left his daughter with a love of the land, an aptitude for farming and an inner strength that makes her seem more mature than most 15-year-olds.

Mr Langfield ensured the 1000-hectare cereal cropping farm, Wallaringa, near the NSW Central West town of Cowra, would pass directly to Marlee (pictured), allowing her to decide in her own time whether farming was in her future.

In the meantime, the farm is being managed by Mr Langfield’s nephew Rod Wright.

Marlee is actively involved in running the farm, along with Mr Wright’s sons Joshua, 17, and Nathan, 16.

“The boys are like brothers to me as I don’t have any siblings close to my own age,” Marlee said.

“Rod makes all the farming decisions at this point because I’m not in a position to do that at the moment.

“It’s hard when you’re not sure what you’re doing but when Rod’s around he demonstrates and explains what to do so that I’ll know next time.”

Mr Wright is proud of Marlee’s positive attitude and enjoys playing an active role in preparing her for a farming future.

“Marlee’s ability to adapt and adjust is absolutely remarkable,” he said.

“We’ve tried to maintain a family farm atmosphere, which means that Marlee is getting the hands-on training she’ll need if she decides to continue with a career as a farmer.

“She has great practical skills as well as an ability to take on board new techniques and innovations.

“She’s very talented and, operationally, I would say she’s better than most boys her age.”

Marlee doesn’t see her gender as an issue or an obstacle to a future in farming and says the ability to work alone as well as with others is one of the most important character traits for a successful farmer.

“It can be lonely spending endless hours on the tractor during sowing or on the header at harvest; I just sing along with the radio for company,” she said.

“You have to be fearless, too.

“You can’t be afraid of much or it’ll hold you back.

“I’m very outgoing and capable in that way – not much really worries me.

“The best part about farming is the freedom it gives you.

“You’re surrounded by big open spaces and you can just grab the dog and hop on the motorbike or in the ute and go for a drive up the paddock to check the crop, repair a fence or measure the rain.

“I’ve definitely inherited a love of the land from Dad.

“He grew up on Wallaringa and helped farm this land with his parents, brother and sisters and then on his own.

“Now Dad has passed it on to me.

“I never really thought actively about whether I would take over the family farm; it was always just there.”

To help prepare her for adult life, Marlee is now doing part of her high school education in Canada, where she is checking out the Canadian farming scene.

Her mother Wendy said it was important for her daughter to gain as many experiences as possible before deciding to settle into farming.

“And, of course, she may decide not to come back to the farm,” she said.

“Marlee has plenty of opportunities ahead and this experience will definitely benefit her.”