AGRICULTURE BIG WINNER AT GREEN GLOBE AWARDS

Picture You in Agriculture founder Lynne Strong and Young Farming Champion (YFC) Mentor and Coach Gaye Steel joined finalist YFC Anika Molesworth at the Art Gallery of NSW last Thursday night  for the announcement of the winners of the 2018 Green Globe Awards.

We were very excited to see agriculture high amongst the accolades. Run by the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage the Green Globe Awards recognise and celebrate individuals and companies contributing to a more sustainable NSW, and this year 41% of the nominations were from regional areas.

Winner of the Young Sustainability Champion Award was YFC Anika Molesworth who was recognised for her efforts to raise the profile of climate action and renewable energy within agriculture.

“After seeing her family’s sheep farm struggle through a decade-long drought, she focused her education and began a career building resilience in fragile farming systems,” NSW Minister for the Environment Gabrielle Upton said.

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Anika Molesworth winner of Young Sustainability Champion with Robin Mellon who is CEO at the Supply Chain Sustainability School

“This was an exciting category due to the incredible work already being done by the young people nominated,” Anika said.  “Angelina Arora, a high school student, is making plastic from a natural waste product, Arlian Ecker is Plastic Free Boy, and Charlotte Rose Mellis has established projects on remote business, waste management and marine ecology. These young people are already charging ahead in environmental management and sustainability.”

“With any one of these people being a well-deserving winner, I was humbled to be selected as the 2018 Young Sustainability Champion for the Green Globe Awards. I believe this recognition goes beyond that for the individual, but extends to the wider community of young people working tirelessly in agriculture to make it the best it possibly can be. These people come with new tech, new skills and new perspectives that are essential for vibrant and resilient farming systems. These people are making a meaningful contribution to food security, the protection of the land and wildlife, are influencing policy and ensuring a bright future, not only for rural Australia, but for all of us.”

Agriculture was also recognised in the Resource Efficiency Award with pig-producer Blantyre Farms winning the category. Blantyre harvests methane emitted by its pigs and uses it in generators, creating 2,000 MWh of renewable electricity each year. This innovative approach to clean energy has meant Blantyre no longer uses electricity from the grid.

Agriculture also featured as a finalist in the Innovation Award with Woolcool Australia recognised for their use of sheep belly wool to produce insulated packaging materials as an alternative to polystyrene.

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Championing solar energy ClearSky Solar Investments won the prestigious Premier’s Award for Environmental Excellence, the Climate Change Leadership Award and the Community Leadership Award and was a finalist in the Innovation category. This recognition further opens opportunities for the agricultural industry to have conversations regarding renewable energy.

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Anika with fellow finalist Arlian Ecker (Plastic Free Boy) and Neale Siebert from ClearSky Solar Investments.

“Transitioning away from polluting and harmful fossil fuels is critical if we are going to give the next generation of food and fibre producers the best possible chance,” Anika said. “Renewable energy in agriculture gives us an exciting, prosperous and bright future.”

#YouthVoices18 #YouthinAg #ClimateAction #StrongerTogether

 

Young Farming Champions Backing a Future for Agriculture in the fragile Far West of NSW

 

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Young Farming Champion and Climate Wise Agriculture founder Anika Molesworth

The arid zone of western New South Wales is hot and dry and expected to become hotter and drier with a changing climate. Forward planning and community collaboration is key to ensuring the future of farming in the fragile Far West. But what tools are needed?

This question will be addressed at “Outback to the Future” an upcoming free public seminar to be held at the Fowlers Gap Research Station near Broken Hill on Saturday May 12. Organised jointly by the University of New South Wales and Climate Wise Agriculture, the seminar will discuss the future of land management including new technology available now, future technology, how productivity and resilience can be increased, and how the latest research findings can be applied on the ground.

“Land managers of the Far West are no strangers to adversity – it’s a strikingly beautiful place to live out here, but it comes with its challenges,” Anika Molesworth from Climate Wise Agriculture said. “This seminar is about looking to the future, asking the hard questions, and working together to come up with solutions.”

Commencing at 10.00am the line-up of speakers includes: social researcher Emily Berry; animal ecologist Simon Griffith; wool and sheep specialist Gregory Sawyer; soil scientist Susan Orgill; livestock behaviourist Danila Marini; Judge at the NSW Land and Environment Court Simon Molesworth; climate researcher and veterinarian Greg Curran; General Manager of Research, Development and Innovation from MLA Sean Starling; local grazier Angus Whyte; artist Peter Sharp; and members of the local Landcare Youth Network.

“It’s a hugely exciting day – we’re going to be talking drones to move livestock, replenishing soil carbon to access green markets, industry innovations, art movements, and hear the visions from young locals,” Anika said.

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Livestock behaviourist and Young Farming Champion Dr Danila Marini

One particular presentation that is bringing futuristic-tech to the outback is that by Danila Marini. “Virtual fencing is exciting technology, giving farmers the ability to set up a fence line from their computer’” Danila said. “Close to commercialisation for cattle, virtual fencing uses GPS and a smart algorithm to contain animals within a boundary through the use of an audio cue. This technology has great potential for the sheep industry, especially for vast properties where fencing is either impractical or too costly.”

For further details on the seminar visit the website at https://outbacktothefuture.weebly.com/

#youthvoices18

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